Endogenous cannabinoids as an aversive or counter-rewarding system in the rat

Endogenous cannabinoids as an aversive or counter-rewarding system in the rat Human use of marijuana ( Cannabis sativa ) is widely assumed to have rewarding properties, a notion supported by its widespread recreational use. However, no study has clearly demonstrated such effects in animal models. The purpose of this study was to test for the presumed rewarding effect of cannabinoids using a conditioned place preference paradigm. The results showed that animals failed to develop place conditioning at a low dose (1.5 mg/kg) and developed a place aversion at a high dose (15 mg/kg) of the active principle in marijuana, Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol ( Δ 9 -THC), a finding consistent with most previous studies. Moreover, the administration of the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716A induced a conditioned place preference at both a low (0.5 mg/kg) and a high (5 mg/kg) dose. In summary, cannabinoid antagonism produced place preference while cannabinoid agonism induced place aversion. These results suggest that endogenous cannabinoids serve normally to suppress reward or to induce aversion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuroscience Letters Elsevier

Endogenous cannabinoids as an aversive or counter-rewarding system in the rat

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd
ISSN
0304-3940
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0304-3940(97)13424-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Human use of marijuana ( Cannabis sativa ) is widely assumed to have rewarding properties, a notion supported by its widespread recreational use. However, no study has clearly demonstrated such effects in animal models. The purpose of this study was to test for the presumed rewarding effect of cannabinoids using a conditioned place preference paradigm. The results showed that animals failed to develop place conditioning at a low dose (1.5 mg/kg) and developed a place aversion at a high dose (15 mg/kg) of the active principle in marijuana, Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol ( Δ 9 -THC), a finding consistent with most previous studies. Moreover, the administration of the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716A induced a conditioned place preference at both a low (0.5 mg/kg) and a high (5 mg/kg) dose. In summary, cannabinoid antagonism produced place preference while cannabinoid agonism induced place aversion. These results suggest that endogenous cannabinoids serve normally to suppress reward or to induce aversion.

Journal

Neuroscience LettersElsevier

Published: Feb 21, 1997

References

  • Reluctance of rats to drink hashish suspensions: free-choice and forced consumption, and the effects of hypothalamic stimulation
    Corcoran, M.E.; Amit, Z.
  • Failure to obtain `cannabis-directed behavior' and abstinence syndrome in rats chronically treated with cannabis sativa extracts
    Leite, J.R.; Carlini, E.A.
  • Aversive effects of the synthetic cannabinoid CP 55,940 in rats
    McGregor, I.S.; Issakidis, C.N.; Prior, G.

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