Endocrine disruptors: from Wingspread to environmental developmental biology

Endocrine disruptors: from Wingspread to environmental developmental biology The production and release of synthetic chemicals into the environment has been a hallmark of the “Second Industrial Revolution” and the “Green Revolution.” Soon after the inception of these chemicals, anecdotal evidence began to emerge linking environmental contamination of rivers and lakes with a variety of developmental and reproductive abnormalities in wildlife species. The accumulation of evidence suggesting that these synthetic chemicals were detrimental to wildlife, and potentially humans, as a result of their hormonal activity, led to the proposal of the endocrine disruptor hypothesis at the 1991 Wingspread Conference. Since that time, experimental and epidemiological data have shown that exposure of the developing fetus or neonate to environmentally-relevant concentrations of certain synthetic chemicals causes morphological, biochemical, physiological and behavioral anomalies in both vertebrate and invertebrate species. The ubiquitous use, and subsequent human exposure, of one particular chemical, the estrogen mimic bisphenol A (BPA), is the subject of this present review. We have highlighted this chemical since it provides an arresting model of how chemical exposure impacts developmental processes involved in the morphogenesis of tissues and organs, including those of the male and female reproductive systems, the mammary glands and the brain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Elsevier

Endocrine disruptors: from Wingspread to environmental developmental biology

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0960-0760
eISSN
1879-1220
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0960-0760(02)00272-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The production and release of synthetic chemicals into the environment has been a hallmark of the “Second Industrial Revolution” and the “Green Revolution.” Soon after the inception of these chemicals, anecdotal evidence began to emerge linking environmental contamination of rivers and lakes with a variety of developmental and reproductive abnormalities in wildlife species. The accumulation of evidence suggesting that these synthetic chemicals were detrimental to wildlife, and potentially humans, as a result of their hormonal activity, led to the proposal of the endocrine disruptor hypothesis at the 1991 Wingspread Conference. Since that time, experimental and epidemiological data have shown that exposure of the developing fetus or neonate to environmentally-relevant concentrations of certain synthetic chemicals causes morphological, biochemical, physiological and behavioral anomalies in both vertebrate and invertebrate species. The ubiquitous use, and subsequent human exposure, of one particular chemical, the estrogen mimic bisphenol A (BPA), is the subject of this present review. We have highlighted this chemical since it provides an arresting model of how chemical exposure impacts developmental processes involved in the morphogenesis of tissues and organs, including those of the male and female reproductive systems, the mammary glands and the brain.

Journal

The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2002

References

  • Effects of bisphenol A and tetrabromobisphenol A on sex organ development in quail and chicken embryos
    Berg, C.; Halldin, K.; Brunstrom, B.
  • Accelerated onset of uterine tumors in transgenic mice with aberrant expression of the estrogen receptor after neonatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol
    Couse, J.F.; Davis, V.L.; Hanson, R.B.; Jefferson, W.N.; McLachlan, J.A.; Bullock, B.C.; Newbold, R.R.; Korach, K.S.
  • Perinatal exposure to the estrogenic pollutant bisphenol A affects behavior in male and female rats
    Farabollini, F.; Porrini, S.; Dessi-Fulgheri, F.
  • Evaluation of chemicals with endocrine modulating activity in a yeast-based steroid hormone receptor gene transcription assay
    Gaido, K.W.; Leonard, L.S.; Lovell, S.; Gould, J.C.; Babai, D.; Portier, C.J.
  • The emergence of molecular gynecology: homeobox and Wnt genes in the female reproductive tract
    Kitajewski, J.; Sassoon, D.A.
  • Exposure to bisphenol A during the fetal and suckling periods disrupts sexual differentiation of the locus coeruleus and of behavior in the rat
    Kubo, K.; Arai, O.; Ogata, R.; Omura, M.; Hori, T.; Aou, S.
  • Mammalian development in a changing environment: exposure to endocrine disruptors reveals the developmental plasticity of steroid-hormone target organs
    Markey, C.M.; Coombs, M.A.; Sonnenschein, C.; Soto, A.M.
  • Estrogenic potency of chemicals detected in sewage treatment plant effluents as determined by in vivo assays with Japanese medaka ( Oryzias latipes )
    Metcalfe, C.D.; Metcalfe, T.L.; Kiparissis, Y.; Koenig, B.G.; Khan, C.; Hughes, R.J.; Croley, T.R.; March, R.E.; Potter, T.
  • Competitive binding of xenobiotic oestrogens of rat alpha-fetoprotein and to sex steroid binding proteins in human and rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) plasma
    Milligan, S.R.; Khan, O.; Nash, M.
  • Effects of endocrine disruptors on prosobranch snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda) in the laboratory. Part I. Bisphenol A and octylphenol as xeno-estrogens
    Oehlmann, J.; Schulte-Oehlmann, U.; Tillmann, M.; Markert, B.
  • Serum bisphenol A concentrations showed gender differences, possibly linked to androgen levels
    Takeuchi, T.; Tsutsumi, O.

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