Enantioselective effects of chiral amide herbicides napropamide, acetochlor and propisochlor: The more efficient R-enantiomer and its environmental friendly

Enantioselective effects of chiral amide herbicides napropamide, acetochlor and propisochlor: The... Amide herbicides, which are used extensively worldwide, are often chiral. Enantiomeric selectivity comes from the different effects of the enantiomers on target and non-target organisms. In this study, the enantiomers of three amide herbicides were purified by the semi-preparative column and were used to investigate the enantioselective effects on target Echinochloa crusgalli (lowland rice weeds), and non-target Microcystis aeruginosa, and the yeast transformed with the human TRβ plasmid organisms. The results showed that (i) the R-enantiomers of the three amide herbicides exhibited the strongest activity toward weed inhibition and the lowest toxicity toward non-target organisms; (ii) napropamide was better suited for controlling root growth, while acetochlor and propisochlor were better for leaves control; (iii) herbicides at certain low concentrations (0.01 mg L−1 for acetochlor and propisochlor) could be utilized to promote plant growth. These findings encourage the use of R-amide herbicides instead of their racemates to increase the efficiency of weed control and reduce the risk to non-target organisms. On the other hand, the adverse effects are caused mostly by S-enantiomer, using R-enantiomer-enriched products may offer great environmental/ecological benefits. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science of the Total Environment Elsevier

Enantioselective effects of chiral amide herbicides napropamide, acetochlor and propisochlor: The more efficient R-enantiomer and its environmental friendly

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0048-9697
eISSN
1879-1026
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.01.140
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Amide herbicides, which are used extensively worldwide, are often chiral. Enantiomeric selectivity comes from the different effects of the enantiomers on target and non-target organisms. In this study, the enantiomers of three amide herbicides were purified by the semi-preparative column and were used to investigate the enantioselective effects on target Echinochloa crusgalli (lowland rice weeds), and non-target Microcystis aeruginosa, and the yeast transformed with the human TRβ plasmid organisms. The results showed that (i) the R-enantiomers of the three amide herbicides exhibited the strongest activity toward weed inhibition and the lowest toxicity toward non-target organisms; (ii) napropamide was better suited for controlling root growth, while acetochlor and propisochlor were better for leaves control; (iii) herbicides at certain low concentrations (0.01 mg L−1 for acetochlor and propisochlor) could be utilized to promote plant growth. These findings encourage the use of R-amide herbicides instead of their racemates to increase the efficiency of weed control and reduce the risk to non-target organisms. On the other hand, the adverse effects are caused mostly by S-enantiomer, using R-enantiomer-enriched products may offer great environmental/ecological benefits.

Journal

Science of the Total EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

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