Emotional labor in librarianship: A research agenda

Emotional labor in librarianship: A research agenda Many occupations, including librarianship, require emotional labor, which can be defined as the awareness of the emotional expressions required of a job, and the strategies used to express those emotions. To date, little research has examined emotional labor in library work, even though strong evidence exists to suggest emotional labor is a key component of many library jobs. Research on emotional labor shows that there can be positive and negative effects on individuals such as job satisfaction and job burnout. Research also shows that the negative outcomes from emotional labor may be buffered to some extent by factors such as support from the organization, or job autonomy. Individual differences such as personality traits and attitudes toward customers also impact the effects of emotional labor on employees. Because emotional labor is a critical issue in library work, and because evidence suggests positive outcomes can be fostered, there is a need to study how emotional labor is carried out in libraries, and to identify management techniques for emotional labor that will yield positive outcomes for both employees and organizations. Empirical research on emotional labor is reviewed, and a research agenda for exploration of this important construct in the field of librarianship is presented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Library & Information Science Research Elsevier

Emotional labor in librarianship: A research agenda

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0740-8188
DOI
10.1016/j.lisr.2012.02.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many occupations, including librarianship, require emotional labor, which can be defined as the awareness of the emotional expressions required of a job, and the strategies used to express those emotions. To date, little research has examined emotional labor in library work, even though strong evidence exists to suggest emotional labor is a key component of many library jobs. Research on emotional labor shows that there can be positive and negative effects on individuals such as job satisfaction and job burnout. Research also shows that the negative outcomes from emotional labor may be buffered to some extent by factors such as support from the organization, or job autonomy. Individual differences such as personality traits and attitudes toward customers also impact the effects of emotional labor on employees. Because emotional labor is a critical issue in library work, and because evidence suggests positive outcomes can be fostered, there is a need to study how emotional labor is carried out in libraries, and to identify management techniques for emotional labor that will yield positive outcomes for both employees and organizations. Empirical research on emotional labor is reviewed, and a research agenda for exploration of this important construct in the field of librarianship is presented.

Journal

Library & Information Science ResearchElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2012

References

  • Development and validation of the emotional labour scale
    Brotheridge, C.M.; Lee, R.T.
  • A predictive study of emotional labor and turnover
    Chau, S.L.; Dahling, J.J.; Levy, P.E.; Diefendorff, J.M.
  • When it pays to be friendly: Employment relationships and emotional labour in hairstyling
    Cohen, R.L.
  • Understanding the emotional labor process: A control theory perspective
    Diefendorff, J.M.; Gosserand, R.H.
  • Are emotional display rules formal job requirements? Examination of employee and supervisor perceptions
    Diefendorff, J.M.; Richard, E.M.; Croyle, M.H.
  • Perceived organizational support as a moderator of emotional labor/outcomes relationships
    Duke, A.B.; Goodman, J.M.; Treadway, D.C.; Breland, J.W.
  • Is emotional labor more difficult for some than for others? A multilevel, experience-sampling study
    Judge, T.A.; Woolf, E.F.; Hurst, C.
  • The relationship between emotional resources and emotional labor: An exploratory study
    Liu, Y.; Prati, L.M.; Perrewe, P.L.; Ferris, G.R.
  • The consequences of emotional labor: Effects on work stress, job satisfaction, and well-being
    Pugliesi, K.
  • Emotional labor: Links to work attitudes and emotional exhaustion
    Seery, B.L.; Corrigall, E.A.
  • Emotions at work: What is the link to patient and staff safety? Implications for nurse managers in the NHS
    Smith, P.; Pearson, P.H.; Ross, F.

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