Electrosurgery: History, Principles, and Current and Future Uses

Electrosurgery: History, Principles, and Current and Future Uses Within the surgeon’s armamentarium, electrosurgical devices stand out as some of the most useful and most-used instruments. Although widely accepted today, the application of electrosurgery was considered a stain on the long-standing traditions of the medical profession until relatively recently. Surgeons who pioneered use of this new technology and developed the instruments were chastised as charlatans. Nonetheless, electrosurgery, and the surgeons who use the instruments, have endured the test of time and are accepted as a welcome part of modern surgery and its history.</P><h5>Evolution of a tool</h5> Many credit the man for whom the “Bovie” was named with being the father of elecrosurgical devices. But the physical scientific advancements behind these instruments had been known for some time before William T Bovie. Surgeons had used cautery and electricity in medicine well before the early 1920s, when Bovie developed the modern-day instrument and helped bring it to the forefront of the profession. Today there are increasing numbers of applications for electrosurgery in the operating room, but cauterization is unquestionably the most common application of the technology. The use of cautery dates back as far as prehistoric times, when heated stones were used to obtain hemostasis. Conductive heating of tissue http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American College of Surgeons Elsevier

Electrosurgery: History, Principles, and Current and Future Uses

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 American College of Surgeons
ISSN
1072-7515
DOI
10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2005.11.017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Within the surgeon’s armamentarium, electrosurgical devices stand out as some of the most useful and most-used instruments. Although widely accepted today, the application of electrosurgery was considered a stain on the long-standing traditions of the medical profession until relatively recently. Surgeons who pioneered use of this new technology and developed the instruments were chastised as charlatans. Nonetheless, electrosurgery, and the surgeons who use the instruments, have endured the test of time and are accepted as a welcome part of modern surgery and its history.</P><h5>Evolution of a tool</h5> Many credit the man for whom the “Bovie” was named with being the father of elecrosurgical devices. But the physical scientific advancements behind these instruments had been known for some time before William T Bovie. Surgeons had used cautery and electricity in medicine well before the early 1920s, when Bovie developed the modern-day instrument and helped bring it to the forefront of the profession. Today there are increasing numbers of applications for electrosurgery in the operating room, but cauterization is unquestionably the most common application of the technology. The use of cautery dates back as far as prehistoric times, when heated stones were used to obtain hemostasis. Conductive heating of tissue

Journal

Journal of the American College of SurgeonsElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2006

References

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