Electrophysiological correlates of timbre imagery and perception

Electrophysiological correlates of timbre imagery and perception The primary objective of the present study was to verify whether the differences in imagined timbre are reflected by the event-related potentials (ERPs). It was verified the hypotheses that imagining of sounds, varying in spectral characteristics of timbre, influence the amplitude of the late positive component (LPC), associated with auditory imagery-related processes. It was also verified whether the manipulation of the perceived timbre corresponds to the amplitude fluctuations of the auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) N1 and P2. Also, it was expected that the amplitudes of the LPC, N1 and P2 components depend on musical expertise.Musicians and non-musicians took part in two experiments, each of which involved timbre manipulation in term of one parameter of the sound spectrum – spectral centroid or spectral irregularity. Each experiment consisted of auditory perception task followed by auditory imagery training and auditory imagery task.The present study showed that differences in perceived timbre associated with spectral centroid and spectral irregularity are reflected by fluctuations in the amplitude of the N1 and P2 potentials. Perceived differences in spectral centroid are sufficiently distinctive that generation of auditory images of sounds differing in this property induces changes in the amplitude of the late positive component (LPC), recorded during auditory imagery. This means that the LPC is sensitive to changes in the timbre of the imagined sound. Musicians are more accurate in performing auditory imagery task related to timbre than non-musicians. However, musical expertise does not affect the amplitude of the N1, P2 and LPC potentials. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Psychophysiology Elsevier

Electrophysiological correlates of timbre imagery and perception

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/electrophysiological-correlates-of-timbre-imagery-and-perception-ssUdO2vsrY
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0167-8760
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2018.05.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The primary objective of the present study was to verify whether the differences in imagined timbre are reflected by the event-related potentials (ERPs). It was verified the hypotheses that imagining of sounds, varying in spectral characteristics of timbre, influence the amplitude of the late positive component (LPC), associated with auditory imagery-related processes. It was also verified whether the manipulation of the perceived timbre corresponds to the amplitude fluctuations of the auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) N1 and P2. Also, it was expected that the amplitudes of the LPC, N1 and P2 components depend on musical expertise.Musicians and non-musicians took part in two experiments, each of which involved timbre manipulation in term of one parameter of the sound spectrum – spectral centroid or spectral irregularity. Each experiment consisted of auditory perception task followed by auditory imagery training and auditory imagery task.The present study showed that differences in perceived timbre associated with spectral centroid and spectral irregularity are reflected by fluctuations in the amplitude of the N1 and P2 potentials. Perceived differences in spectral centroid are sufficiently distinctive that generation of auditory images of sounds differing in this property induces changes in the amplitude of the late positive component (LPC), recorded during auditory imagery. This means that the LPC is sensitive to changes in the timbre of the imagined sound. Musicians are more accurate in performing auditory imagery task related to timbre than non-musicians. However, musical expertise does not affect the amplitude of the N1, P2 and LPC potentials.

Journal

International Journal of PsychophysiologyElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off