Electric energy production from food waste: Microbial fuel cells versus anaerobic digestion

Electric energy production from food waste: Microbial fuel cells versus anaerobic digestion Bioresource Technology 255 (2018) 281–287 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Bioresource Technology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/biortech Electric energy production from food waste: Microbial fuel cells versus anaerobic digestion a,b,1 b,1 b,c, Xiaodong Xin , Yingqun Ma , Yu Liu School of Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090, PR China Advanced Environmental Biotechnology Centre, Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, Singapore 637141, Singapore School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore GR APHICAL A BSTRACT ARTICLE I NFO ABSTRACT Keywords: A food waste resourceful process was developed by integrating the ultra-fast hydrolysis and microbial fuel cells Food waste (MFCs) for energy and resource recovery. Food waste was first ultra-fast hydrolyzed by fungal mash rich in Fungal mash hydrolytic enzymes in-situ produced from food waste. After which, the separated solids were readily converted Microbial fuel cells to biofertilizer, while the liquid was fed to MFCs for direct electricity generation with a conversion efficiency of Electricity 0.245 kWh/kg food waste. It was estimated that about 192.5 million kWh of electricity could be produced from Biofertilize the food waste annually generated in Singapore, together with 74,390 tonnes of dry biofertilizer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bioresource Technology Elsevier

Electric energy production from food waste: Microbial fuel cells versus anaerobic digestion

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0960-8524
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.biortech.2018.01.099
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bioresource Technology 255 (2018) 281–287 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Bioresource Technology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/biortech Electric energy production from food waste: Microbial fuel cells versus anaerobic digestion a,b,1 b,1 b,c, Xiaodong Xin , Yingqun Ma , Yu Liu School of Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090, PR China Advanced Environmental Biotechnology Centre, Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, Singapore 637141, Singapore School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore GR APHICAL A BSTRACT ARTICLE I NFO ABSTRACT Keywords: A food waste resourceful process was developed by integrating the ultra-fast hydrolysis and microbial fuel cells Food waste (MFCs) for energy and resource recovery. Food waste was first ultra-fast hydrolyzed by fungal mash rich in Fungal mash hydrolytic enzymes in-situ produced from food waste. After which, the separated solids were readily converted Microbial fuel cells to biofertilizer, while the liquid was fed to MFCs for direct electricity generation with a conversion efficiency of Electricity 0.245 kWh/kg food waste. It was estimated that about 192.5 million kWh of electricity could be produced from Biofertilize the food waste annually generated in Singapore, together with 74,390 tonnes of dry biofertilizer.

Journal

Bioresource TechnologyElsevier

Published: May 1, 2018

References

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