Effects of oil dispersants on photodegradation of parent and alkylated anthracene in seawater

Effects of oil dispersants on photodegradation of parent and alkylated anthracene in seawater This study investigated effects of three model oil dispersants on photodegradation of two model PAHs (anthracene and 9,10-dimethyanthracene (9,10-DMA)) under simulated sunlight. All three dispersants, i.e. Corexit EC9500A, Corexit EC9527A and SPC 1000, promoted the photolysis rate of 9,10-DMA, following the order of Corexit EC9500A > Corexit EC9527A > SPC 1000. The photodegradation rate was well interpreted by a two-stage, first-order kinetic law with a faster initial photolysis rate in the presence of the dispersants. Span 80, Tween 85 and kerosene were found as the key dispersant components, of which Span 80 and Tween 85 promoted the photodegradation by boosting absorbance of solar irradiation while kerosene by dispersing more PAHs in the upper layer of the water column. Dissolved oxygen (DO) inhibited photolysis of anthracene regardless of dispersant resulting from quenching the excited states of the PAH, while DO facilitated photolysis of 9,10-DMA due to the formation singlet oxygen (1O2) radicals in the presence of oil dispersants. The other ROS, i.e. •O2− and •OH, played a negligible role on the photodegradation of anthracene and 9,10-DMA. Fluorescence analysis showed that more anthracene was associated with dispersant than 9,10-DMA, which favored the direct transfer of energy to anthracene, while energy is more likely transferred to oxygen to form 1O2 in the case of 9,10-DMA. Direct photolysis dominated the photodegradation of anthracene and 9,10-DMA. Both direct ionization of anthracene and the electron transfer from excited 9,10-DMA to oxygen can lead to formation of the corresponding PAH radical cations. Overall, the oil dispersants accelerated the photolysis rates of the PAHs without altering the degradation pathway. The findings are useful for understanding photochemical weathering of dispersed oil components in the environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Effects of oil dispersants on photodegradation of parent and alkylated anthracene in seawater

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.05.084
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigated effects of three model oil dispersants on photodegradation of two model PAHs (anthracene and 9,10-dimethyanthracene (9,10-DMA)) under simulated sunlight. All three dispersants, i.e. Corexit EC9500A, Corexit EC9527A and SPC 1000, promoted the photolysis rate of 9,10-DMA, following the order of Corexit EC9500A > Corexit EC9527A > SPC 1000. The photodegradation rate was well interpreted by a two-stage, first-order kinetic law with a faster initial photolysis rate in the presence of the dispersants. Span 80, Tween 85 and kerosene were found as the key dispersant components, of which Span 80 and Tween 85 promoted the photodegradation by boosting absorbance of solar irradiation while kerosene by dispersing more PAHs in the upper layer of the water column. Dissolved oxygen (DO) inhibited photolysis of anthracene regardless of dispersant resulting from quenching the excited states of the PAH, while DO facilitated photolysis of 9,10-DMA due to the formation singlet oxygen (1O2) radicals in the presence of oil dispersants. The other ROS, i.e. •O2− and •OH, played a negligible role on the photodegradation of anthracene and 9,10-DMA. Fluorescence analysis showed that more anthracene was associated with dispersant than 9,10-DMA, which favored the direct transfer of energy to anthracene, while energy is more likely transferred to oxygen to form 1O2 in the case of 9,10-DMA. Direct photolysis dominated the photodegradation of anthracene and 9,10-DMA. Both direct ionization of anthracene and the electron transfer from excited 9,10-DMA to oxygen can lead to formation of the corresponding PAH radical cations. Overall, the oil dispersants accelerated the photolysis rates of the PAHs without altering the degradation pathway. The findings are useful for understanding photochemical weathering of dispersed oil components in the environment.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2017

References

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