Effects of lime addition on sewage sludge composting process

Effects of lime addition on sewage sludge composting process Previous study showed that co-composting sewage sludge with lime would effectively reduce the availability of heavy metals in the sludge compost. In the present study, effects of addition of lime on the microbial activities of sewage sludge composting were evaluated in a bench-scale in-vessel system through monitoring biological parameters including microbial respiration, microbial populations (thermophile and mesophile), and activities of related enzyme (dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, β -glucosidase, and urease). Lime raised the pH of the sludge compost effectively at the initial period, and this effect became less obvious with an increase in composting time. Adverse effects of lime amendment on all biological parameters increased with an increase in lime application rates, but these effects were generally restricted to the early stage of the thermophilic phase. Addition of 0.63% lime prior to sludge composting slightly improved the microbial activity as indicated by the higher temperature and CO 2 evolution and did not exert a significant inhibition on bacterial population, and the activities of β -glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, and dehydrogenase after 100 days of composting. This together with our previous results on heavy metal availability supports the use of lime at a rate of <1.0% (w/w) to co-compost with sewage sludge. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Research Elsevier

Effects of lime addition on sewage sludge composting process

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Abstract

Previous study showed that co-composting sewage sludge with lime would effectively reduce the availability of heavy metals in the sludge compost. In the present study, effects of addition of lime on the microbial activities of sewage sludge composting were evaluated in a bench-scale in-vessel system through monitoring biological parameters including microbial respiration, microbial populations (thermophile and mesophile), and activities of related enzyme (dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, β -glucosidase, and urease). Lime raised the pH of the sludge compost effectively at the initial period, and this effect became less obvious with an increase in composting time. Adverse effects of lime amendment on all biological parameters increased with an increase in lime application rates, but these effects were generally restricted to the early stage of the thermophilic phase. Addition of 0.63% lime prior to sludge composting slightly improved the microbial activity as indicated by the higher temperature and CO 2 evolution and did not exert a significant inhibition on bacterial population, and the activities of β -glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, and dehydrogenase after 100 days of composting. This together with our previous results on heavy metal availability supports the use of lime at a rate of <1.0% (w/w) to co-compost with sewage sludge.

Journal

Water ResearchElsevier

Published: Oct 15, 2000

References

  • Co-composting of sewage sludge and coal fly ash: nutrient transformations
    Fang, M.; Wong, J.W.C.; Ma, K.K.; Wong, M.H.
  • Effects of lime amendment on availability of heavy metals and maturation in sewage sludge composting
    Fang, M.; Wong, J.W.C.
  • The effects of clay amendment and composting on metal speciation in digested sludge
    Qiao, L.; Ho, G.
  • The growth of Brassica chinensis in heavy-metal-contaminated sewage sludge compost from Hong Kong
    Wong, J.W.C.; Li, G.X.; Wong, M.H.

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