Effects of infertility insurance mandates on fertility

Effects of infertility insurance mandates on fertility Infertility currently affects over 6 million individuals in the United States. While most health insurance plans nationwide do not cover infertility diagnoses or treatments, to date 15 states have enacted some form of infertility insurance mandate. In this paper, I use data from the Vital Statistics Detail Natality Data and Census population estimates to examine whether these state-level mandates were successful in increasing fertility rates. Using a difference-in-differences approach, I exploit variation in the enactment of mandates both across states and over time, and identify treatment and control groups that should have been differentially affected by infertility coverage. My results suggest that the mandates significantly increase first birth rates for women over 35, and these results are robust to a number of specification tests. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Health Economics Elsevier

Effects of infertility insurance mandates on fertility

Journal of Health Economics, Volume 26 (3) – May 1, 2007

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0167-6296
eISSN
1879-1646
DOI
10.1016/j.jhealeco.2006.10.012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Infertility currently affects over 6 million individuals in the United States. While most health insurance plans nationwide do not cover infertility diagnoses or treatments, to date 15 states have enacted some form of infertility insurance mandate. In this paper, I use data from the Vital Statistics Detail Natality Data and Census population estimates to examine whether these state-level mandates were successful in increasing fertility rates. Using a difference-in-differences approach, I exploit variation in the enactment of mandates both across states and over time, and identify treatment and control groups that should have been differentially affected by infertility coverage. My results suggest that the mandates significantly increase first birth rates for women over 35, and these results are robust to a number of specification tests.

Journal

Journal of Health EconomicsElsevier

Published: May 1, 2007

References

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