Effects of four workplace lighting technologies on perception, cognition and affective state

Effects of four workplace lighting technologies on perception, cognition and affective state Light-emitting diodes (LED) are becoming an increasingly common lighting option for industrial applications, offering superior power efficiency and longevity relative to conventional fluorescent technologies. This study examined the visual perceptual, affective and cognitive implications of equipping temporary military shelters with either fluorescent or one of three advanced LED lighting systems with varied color temperature and luminance. Twenty-four volunteers were each tested over the course of five consecutive days, including a practice session and four test sessions, one for each of the lighting conditions. Volunteers showed highest visual acuity as measured on symbol identification and color recognition tasks with LED relative to fluorescent lighting and this effect was greatest at highest color temperatures. In terms of psychological and cognitive performance, volunteers showed increased fatigue ratings with fluorescent relative to LED, and this effect was associated with slower response times on tasks measuring spatial and verbal memory. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics Elsevier

Effects of four workplace lighting technologies on perception, cognition and affective state

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0169-8141
eISSN
1872-8219
DOI
10.1016/j.ergon.2011.09.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Light-emitting diodes (LED) are becoming an increasingly common lighting option for industrial applications, offering superior power efficiency and longevity relative to conventional fluorescent technologies. This study examined the visual perceptual, affective and cognitive implications of equipping temporary military shelters with either fluorescent or one of three advanced LED lighting systems with varied color temperature and luminance. Twenty-four volunteers were each tested over the course of five consecutive days, including a practice session and four test sessions, one for each of the lighting conditions. Volunteers showed highest visual acuity as measured on symbol identification and color recognition tasks with LED relative to fluorescent lighting and this effect was greatest at highest color temperatures. In terms of psychological and cognitive performance, volunteers showed increased fatigue ratings with fluorescent relative to LED, and this effect was associated with slower response times on tasks measuring spatial and verbal memory.

Journal

International Journal of Industrial ErgonomicsElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2012

References

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    Baron, R.A.
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  • Caffeine modulates attention network function
    Brunye, T.T.; Mahoney, C.R.; Lieberman, H.R.; Taylor, H.A.
  • Effects of noise, heat and indoor lighting on cognitive performance and self-reported affect
    Hygge, S.; Knez, I.
  • Mechanisms involved in enhancing human performance by changing the lighting the industrial workplace
    Juslén, H.; Tenner, A.
  • Appreciation of localised task lighting in shift work – a field study in the food industry
    Juslén, H.; Verbossen, J.; Wouters, M.C.H.M.
  • Effects of indoor lighting on mood and cognition
    Knez, I.
  • Observations on two new artificial lights for reptile displays
    Laszlo, J.

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