Effects of forest fragmentation on a guild of wintering passerines: The role of habitat selection

Effects of forest fragmentation on a guild of wintering passerines: The role of habitat selection This study analyses the winter colonization of an archipelago of 31 forests (0·1–350 ha) in central Spain by the guild of pariforms ( Parus, Aegithalos, Regulus, Sitta and Certhia ). Two hypotheses are considered: (a) that birds with similar habitat preferences tend to disappear simultaneously with the reduction in forest size, leading to a ‘nested’ pattern of species distribution; or (b) that the species in the smallest forests are a random sample of those found in the larger ones. The results support hypothesis (a). The species that depend on relatively scarce resources, such as tree trunks and junipers Juniperus thurifera ( Sitta europaea, Certhia brachydactyla, Parus cristatus and P.ater ) only occupied the largest forests. On the other hand, species that exploit abundant, ubiquitous resources, such as holm oak Quercus ilex foliage ( Regulus ignicapillus and Parus caeruleus ), were distributed uniformly throughout all the fragments. These results emphasize the need for a better understanding of habitat selection by species when designing conservation strategies for fragmented populations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Effects of forest fragmentation on a guild of wintering passerines: The role of habitat selection

Biological Conservation, Volume 71 (1) – Jan 1, 1995

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
DOI
10.1016/0006-3207(94)00021-H
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study analyses the winter colonization of an archipelago of 31 forests (0·1–350 ha) in central Spain by the guild of pariforms ( Parus, Aegithalos, Regulus, Sitta and Certhia ). Two hypotheses are considered: (a) that birds with similar habitat preferences tend to disappear simultaneously with the reduction in forest size, leading to a ‘nested’ pattern of species distribution; or (b) that the species in the smallest forests are a random sample of those found in the larger ones. The results support hypothesis (a). The species that depend on relatively scarce resources, such as tree trunks and junipers Juniperus thurifera ( Sitta europaea, Certhia brachydactyla, Parus cristatus and P.ater ) only occupied the largest forests. On the other hand, species that exploit abundant, ubiquitous resources, such as holm oak Quercus ilex foliage ( Regulus ignicapillus and Parus caeruleus ), were distributed uniformly throughout all the fragments. These results emphasize the need for a better understanding of habitat selection by species when designing conservation strategies for fragmented populations.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References

  • Nested subsets and the distribution of birds on isolated woodlots
    Blake, J.G.
  • Tree species of foraging insectivorous birds in a northern hardwood forest
    Holmes, R.T.; Robinson, S.K.
  • Nested subsets and the structure of insular mammalian faunas and archipelagoes
    Patterson, B.D.; Atmar, W.
  • The contribution of population and community biology to conservation science
    Simberloff, D.
  • Reconstructed dynamics of rapid extinction of chaparral-requiring birds in urban habitat islands
    Soulé, M.E.; Bolger, D.T.; Alberts, A.C.; Sauvajot, R.J.; Wright, J.; Sorice, M.; Hill, S.
  • Foraging niche dynamics and overlap in a guild of passerine birds in a south Swedish coniferous woodland
    Ulfstrand, S.

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