Effects of dietary 2,2′, 4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) exposure on medaka (Oryzias latipes) swimming behavior

Effects of dietary 2,2′, 4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) exposure on medaka (Oryzias... A diet fortified with 2,2′, 4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47: 0, 10, 100, and 1000 ng/g) was dosed to 4–7-day-old post-hatch medaka fish for 40 days to evaluate the effects on the swimming activity of fish using a miniaturized swimming flume. Chlorpyrifos (CF)-exposed fish were selected as the positive control to assess the validity and sensitivity of the behavioral findings. After 20 and 40 days of exposure, the locomotor activity was analyzed for 6 min in a flume section (arena). The CF positive control for each time point were fish exposed to 50 ng CF/ml for 48 h. Swimming patterns, presented as two-dimensional heat maps of fish movement and positioning, were obtained by geostatistical analyses. The heat maps of the control groups at time point 20 revealed visually comparable swimming patterns to those of the BDE-47-treated groups. For the comparative fish positioning analysis, both the arenas were divided into 15 proportional areas. No statistical differences were found between residence times in the areas from the control groups and those from the BDE-47-treated groups. At time point 40, the heat map overall patterns of the control groups differed visually from that of the 100-ng BDE-47/g-treated group, but a comparative analysis of the residence times in the corresponding 15 areas did not reveal consistent differences. The relative distances traveled by the control and treated groups at time points 20 and 40 were also comparable. The heat maps of CF-treated fish at both time points showed contrasting swim patterns with respect to those of the controls. These differential patterns were statistically supported with differences in the residence times for different areas. The relative distances traveled by the CF-treated fish were also significantly shorter. These results confirm the validity of the experimental design and indicate that a dietary BDE-47 exposure does not affect forced swimming in medaka at growing stages. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies Elsevier

Effects of dietary 2,2′, 4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) exposure on medaka (Oryzias latipes) swimming behavior

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Publisher
Pergamon
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0968-090X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.08.122
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A diet fortified with 2,2′, 4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47: 0, 10, 100, and 1000 ng/g) was dosed to 4–7-day-old post-hatch medaka fish for 40 days to evaluate the effects on the swimming activity of fish using a miniaturized swimming flume. Chlorpyrifos (CF)-exposed fish were selected as the positive control to assess the validity and sensitivity of the behavioral findings. After 20 and 40 days of exposure, the locomotor activity was analyzed for 6 min in a flume section (arena). The CF positive control for each time point were fish exposed to 50 ng CF/ml for 48 h. Swimming patterns, presented as two-dimensional heat maps of fish movement and positioning, were obtained by geostatistical analyses. The heat maps of the control groups at time point 20 revealed visually comparable swimming patterns to those of the BDE-47-treated groups. For the comparative fish positioning analysis, both the arenas were divided into 15 proportional areas. No statistical differences were found between residence times in the areas from the control groups and those from the BDE-47-treated groups. At time point 40, the heat map overall patterns of the control groups differed visually from that of the 100-ng BDE-47/g-treated group, but a comparative analysis of the residence times in the corresponding 15 areas did not reveal consistent differences. The relative distances traveled by the control and treated groups at time points 20 and 40 were also comparable. The heat maps of CF-treated fish at both time points showed contrasting swim patterns with respect to those of the controls. These differential patterns were statistically supported with differences in the residence times for different areas. The relative distances traveled by the CF-treated fish were also significantly shorter. These results confirm the validity of the experimental design and indicate that a dietary BDE-47 exposure does not affect forced swimming in medaka at growing stages.

Journal

Transportation Research Part C: Emerging TechnologiesElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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