Effects of chronic naloxone administration on vacuous chewing movements and catalepsy in rats treated with long-term haloperidol decanoate

Effects of chronic naloxone administration on vacuous chewing movements and catalepsy in rats... Most antipsychotic medications produce motoric side effects, including parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia (TD). Correlates of these behaviors in rats (catalepsy and vacuous chewing movements, respectively) were used as a model to assess the usefulness of chronic naloxone administration in symptom reduction. Previous studies have suggested that increased neurotransmission in the endogenous opioid system modulates neuroleptic-induced motoric side effects. Rats were treated with haloperidol decanoate or vehicle for 27 weeks, and withdrawn for 30 weeks. Subsequently, naloxone (0.5 to 2.0 mg/kg SC twice daily) was given for 5 weeks. Long-term haloperidol treatment produced a syndrome of vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) that persisted during the drug withdrawal period. Catalepsy developed rapidly and also persisted. Naloxone treatment had little effect on VCMs but increased catalepsy scores in both haloperidol and vehicle treated groups. Naloxone reduced rearing and grooming in haloperidol rats while increasing these measures in vehicle treated rats. The results indicate that neuroleptic-induced motoric side effects are not reversed by naloxone in rats. Furthermore, they suggest that increased opioid neurotransmission may not underlie the expression of VCMs. This does not rule out the possibility that endogenous opioid system may be involved in the development of VCMs. To the extent that this animal model is valid, naloxone may not be effective in treating TD and neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism in humans. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Bulletin Elsevier

Effects of chronic naloxone administration on vacuous chewing movements and catalepsy in rats treated with long-term haloperidol decanoate

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0361-9230
eISSN
1873-2747
DOI
10.1016/0361-9230(95)00108-Q
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most antipsychotic medications produce motoric side effects, including parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia (TD). Correlates of these behaviors in rats (catalepsy and vacuous chewing movements, respectively) were used as a model to assess the usefulness of chronic naloxone administration in symptom reduction. Previous studies have suggested that increased neurotransmission in the endogenous opioid system modulates neuroleptic-induced motoric side effects. Rats were treated with haloperidol decanoate or vehicle for 27 weeks, and withdrawn for 30 weeks. Subsequently, naloxone (0.5 to 2.0 mg/kg SC twice daily) was given for 5 weeks. Long-term haloperidol treatment produced a syndrome of vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) that persisted during the drug withdrawal period. Catalepsy developed rapidly and also persisted. Naloxone treatment had little effect on VCMs but increased catalepsy scores in both haloperidol and vehicle treated groups. Naloxone reduced rearing and grooming in haloperidol rats while increasing these measures in vehicle treated rats. The results indicate that neuroleptic-induced motoric side effects are not reversed by naloxone in rats. Furthermore, they suggest that increased opioid neurotransmission may not underlie the expression of VCMs. This does not rule out the possibility that endogenous opioid system may be involved in the development of VCMs. To the extent that this animal model is valid, naloxone may not be effective in treating TD and neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism in humans.

Journal

Brain Research BulletinElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References

  • GM1 ganglioside attenuates the development of vacuous chewing movements induced by long-term haloperidol treatment of rats
    Andreassen, O.A.; Jorgensen, H.A.
  • Time dose relationships for locomotor effects of morphine after acute or repeated treatment
    Babbini, M.; Davis, N.M.
  • Neuroleptic-induced vacuous chewing movements in rodents: Incidence and effects of long-term increases in haloperidol dose
    Egan, M.F.; Hyde, T.H.; Kleinman, J.E.; Wyatt, R.J.
  • Oral dyskinesia in rats following brain lesions and neuroleptic drug administration
    Gunne, L.M.; Growden, J.; Glaeser, B.
  • Intranigral infusion of enkephalins elicits dyskinetic biting in rats
    Liminga, U.; Johansson, P.; Nylander, I.; Gunne, L.M.
  • Effects of naloxone on the behaviour of rats exposed to a novel environment
    Rodgers, R.J.; Deacon, R.M.
  • Differences in morphine reinforcement property in two inbred rat strains: Associations with cortical receptors, behavioral activity, analgesia, and the cataleptic effects of morphine
    Sudakov, S.K.; Goldberg, S.R.; Borisova, E.V.; Surkova, L.A.; Turina, I.V.; Rusakov, D.J.; Elmer, G.I.
  • Neuroleptic-induced vacuous chewing movements as an animal model of tardive dyskinesia: A study in three rat strains
    Tamminga, C.A.; Dale, J.M.; Goodman, L.; Kaneda, H.; Kaneda, N.
  • Involvement of the nigrotectal and nigrothalamic pathways in kappa opioid-induced circling
    Thompson, L.A.; Walker, J.M.
  • Spontaneous orofacial movements induced in rodents by very long-term neuroleptic drug administration: Phenomenology, pathophysiology and putative relationship to tardive dyskinesia
    Waddington, J.L.

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