Effectiveness of using a video game to teach a course in mechanical engineering

Effectiveness of using a video game to teach a course in mechanical engineering One of the core courses in the undergraduate mechanical engineering curriculum has been completely redesigned. In the new numerical methods course, all assignments and learning experiences are built around a video/computer game. Students are given the task of writing computer programs to race a simulated car around a track. In doing so, students learn and implement numerical methods content. The design of the course, around a video game, is rooted in commonly accepted theories of how people learn. The article describes a study to assess the effectiveness of the video game-based course. Results show that students taking the game-based course, on average, spend roughly twice as much time, outside of class, on their course work. In a concept mapping exercise, students taking the game-based course demonstrate deeper learning compared to their counterparts taking traditional lecture/textbook-based numerical methods courses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Computers & Education Elsevier

Effectiveness of using a video game to teach a course in mechanical engineering

Computers & Education, Volume 53 (3) – Nov 1, 2009

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0360-1315
eISSN
1873-782X
DOI
10.1016/j.compedu.2009.05.012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the core courses in the undergraduate mechanical engineering curriculum has been completely redesigned. In the new numerical methods course, all assignments and learning experiences are built around a video/computer game. Students are given the task of writing computer programs to race a simulated car around a track. In doing so, students learn and implement numerical methods content. The design of the course, around a video game, is rooted in commonly accepted theories of how people learn. The article describes a study to assess the effectiveness of the video game-based course. Results show that students taking the game-based course, on average, spend roughly twice as much time, outside of class, on their course work. In a concept mapping exercise, students taking the game-based course demonstrate deeper learning compared to their counterparts taking traditional lecture/textbook-based numerical methods courses.

Journal

Computers & EducationElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2009

References

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