Effect of starch filler on calcium-alginate hydrogels loaded with yerba mate antioxidants

Effect of starch filler on calcium-alginate hydrogels loaded with yerba mate antioxidants 1 Introduction</h5> Application of hydrogels obtained from polysaccharides in the food industry are constantly increasing, due to the high demand of natural and environmentally compatible materials ( Farris, Schaich, Liu, Piergiovanni, & Yam, 2009 ). In this way, hydrogels have been used as carriers of bioactive compounds such as natural antioxidants, cells, unsatured oils, drugs, among others ( Deladino, Anbinder, Navarro, & Martino, 2008; Gbassi, Vandamme, Ennahar, & Marchioni, 2009; Goh, Heng, & Chan, 2012 ; Pongjanyakul & Rongthong, 2010 ).</P>Sodium alginate is soluble in water and can form hydrogel beads by dropping the aqueous solution into a divalent or polyvalent cation solution ( Draget, Steinsvåg, Onsøyen, & Smidsrød, 1998 ). Although this is a simple and fast way of obtaining encapsulating systems, the method presents a major limitation consisting in loss during bead preparation. Active compound losses are favor by both, the time necessary for the cation to diffuse into the bead and the compound concentration gradient between the beads and surrounding solution. Besides, the presence of macropores in the alginate matrix facilitates the diffusion of hydrophilic molecules ( George & Abraham, 2006; Gouin, 2004 ). However, some researchers were able to solve this problem by mixing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Carbohydrate Polymers Elsevier

Effect of starch filler on calcium-alginate hydrogels loaded with yerba mate antioxidants

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0144-8617
DOI
10.1016/j.carbpol.2013.03.019
Publisher site
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Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Application of hydrogels obtained from polysaccharides in the food industry are constantly increasing, due to the high demand of natural and environmentally compatible materials ( Farris, Schaich, Liu, Piergiovanni, & Yam, 2009 ). In this way, hydrogels have been used as carriers of bioactive compounds such as natural antioxidants, cells, unsatured oils, drugs, among others ( Deladino, Anbinder, Navarro, & Martino, 2008; Gbassi, Vandamme, Ennahar, & Marchioni, 2009; Goh, Heng, & Chan, 2012 ; Pongjanyakul & Rongthong, 2010 ).</P>Sodium alginate is soluble in water and can form hydrogel beads by dropping the aqueous solution into a divalent or polyvalent cation solution ( Draget, Steinsvåg, Onsøyen, & Smidsrød, 1998 ). Although this is a simple and fast way of obtaining encapsulating systems, the method presents a major limitation consisting in loss during bead preparation. Active compound losses are favor by both, the time necessary for the cation to diffuse into the bead and the compound concentration gradient between the beads and surrounding solution. Besides, the presence of macropores in the alginate matrix facilitates the diffusion of hydrophilic molecules ( George & Abraham, 2006; Gouin, 2004 ). However, some researchers were able to solve this problem by mixing

Journal

Carbohydrate PolymersElsevier

Published: Jun 5, 2013

References

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