Effect of protease treatment on the baking quality of brown rice bread: From textural and rheological properties to biochemistry and microstructure

Effect of protease treatment on the baking quality of brown rice bread: From textural and... In this study, protease treatment of brown rice (BR) batters was investigated in order to evaluate its impact on the textural and baking properties of BR bread. The enzymatic treatment improved bread quality by significantly increasing specific volume ( p < 0.05), while decreasing crumb hardness and chewiness ( p < 0.05). Fundamental rheology and viscometry of batters revealed that protein hydrolysis induced lower complex modulus and initial viscosity, while phase angle was unaffected. Flour pasting properties were also affected, with a significant decrease in paste viscosity and breakdown ( p < 0.05). Protein analysis of batters revealed that the enzymatic treatment induced the release of low molecular weight proteins from macromolecular protein complexes. In conclusion, a lower resistance to deformation of batters during proofing and in the early stages of baking as well as the preserved batter elasticity and the increased paste stability positively affected the breadmaking performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cereal Science Elsevier

Effect of protease treatment on the baking quality of brown rice bread: From textural and rheological properties to biochemistry and microstructure

Journal of Cereal Science, Volume 50 (1) – Jul 1, 2009

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0733-5210
eISSN
1095-9963
DOI
10.1016/j.jcs.2009.02.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this study, protease treatment of brown rice (BR) batters was investigated in order to evaluate its impact on the textural and baking properties of BR bread. The enzymatic treatment improved bread quality by significantly increasing specific volume ( p < 0.05), while decreasing crumb hardness and chewiness ( p < 0.05). Fundamental rheology and viscometry of batters revealed that protein hydrolysis induced lower complex modulus and initial viscosity, while phase angle was unaffected. Flour pasting properties were also affected, with a significant decrease in paste viscosity and breakdown ( p < 0.05). Protein analysis of batters revealed that the enzymatic treatment induced the release of low molecular weight proteins from macromolecular protein complexes. In conclusion, a lower resistance to deformation of batters during proofing and in the early stages of baking as well as the preserved batter elasticity and the increased paste stability positively affected the breadmaking performance.

Journal

Journal of Cereal ScienceElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2009

References

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