Effect of phosphate concentration, anions, heavy metals, and organic matter on phosphate adsorption from wastewater using anodized iron oxide nanoflakes

Effect of phosphate concentration, anions, heavy metals, and organic matter on phosphate... Phosphorus is a necessary nutrient for the growth and survival of living beings. Nevertheless, an oversupply of phosphorus in wastewater results in eutrophication. Therefore, its removal from wastewater is important. However, coexisting components, such as anions, heavy metals, and organic matter, might inhibit the phosphate-adsorption mechanism by competing for the active surface sites of the adsorbent. In this study, iron oxide nanoflakes (INFs) were fabricated on iron foil via anodization. The rate of phosphate adsorption from wastewater onto INFs in the presence of three different coexisting components—anions, heavy metals, and organic matter—was evaluated. The morphology of the INFs was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The phosphate adsorption equilibrium time using INFs was found to be 1 h. The Elovich model (R2 > 0.99) and the Langmuir model (R2 >0.95) respectively provided the best description of the adsorption kinetics and isotherm, suggesting the chemisorption nature of adsorption. The estimated adsorption capacity of the INFs was 21.5 mg-P g–1. The effect of anions (chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and carbonate) and heavy metals (Cd, As, Cr, and Pb) was studied at three different molar ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, and 1.5:1). The effect of different types of organic matter, such as citric acid, humic acid, and oxalic acid at concentrations of 100 and 200 mg L–1, was also examined. In five regeneration cycles, the total amount of phosphate adsorbed and desorbed, and the recovery percentage were 6.51 mg-P g–1, 5.16 mg-P g–1, and 79.24%, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Research Elsevier

Effect of phosphate concentration, anions, heavy metals, and organic matter on phosphate adsorption from wastewater using anodized iron oxide nanoflakes

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0013-9351
eISSN
1096-0953
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envres.2019.01.055
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Phosphorus is a necessary nutrient for the growth and survival of living beings. Nevertheless, an oversupply of phosphorus in wastewater results in eutrophication. Therefore, its removal from wastewater is important. However, coexisting components, such as anions, heavy metals, and organic matter, might inhibit the phosphate-adsorption mechanism by competing for the active surface sites of the adsorbent. In this study, iron oxide nanoflakes (INFs) were fabricated on iron foil via anodization. The rate of phosphate adsorption from wastewater onto INFs in the presence of three different coexisting components—anions, heavy metals, and organic matter—was evaluated. The morphology of the INFs was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The phosphate adsorption equilibrium time using INFs was found to be 1 h. The Elovich model (R2 > 0.99) and the Langmuir model (R2 >0.95) respectively provided the best description of the adsorption kinetics and isotherm, suggesting the chemisorption nature of adsorption. The estimated adsorption capacity of the INFs was 21.5 mg-P g–1. The effect of anions (chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and carbonate) and heavy metals (Cd, As, Cr, and Pb) was studied at three different molar ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, and 1.5:1). The effect of different types of organic matter, such as citric acid, humic acid, and oxalic acid at concentrations of 100 and 200 mg L–1, was also examined. In five regeneration cycles, the total amount of phosphate adsorbed and desorbed, and the recovery percentage were 6.51 mg-P g–1, 5.16 mg-P g–1, and 79.24%, respectively.

Journal

Environmental ResearchElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2019

References

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