Effect of loading system inertia on tribological behaviour of ceramic–ceramic, ceramic–metal and metal–metal dry sliding contacts

Effect of loading system inertia on tribological behaviour of ceramic–ceramic, ceramic–metal... 1 Introduction</h5> Laboratory tribological testing can hardly completely simulate conditions experienced in service (real conditions) [1–7] . When two rough surfaces are in sliding contact then normal displacements occur and excitation of vibration takes place [2] . Level of vibration (displacement amplitude, velocity and acceleration) is affected by load, sliding speed, motion type, contact geometry, test environment, sample parameters (material composition, structure, surface finish, etc.) and characteristics of tribo-device (machine dynamics) resulting from design (stiffness of frame, sample fixation, etc.) and method of load application (dead weight, pneumatic or hydraulic, servo controlled, etc) [4] . A variations of nearly two orders of magnitude for ceramic–ceramic tribopair were seen in tests that were carried out under nominally identical conditions due to changes in the dominant wear mechanism promoted by the alteration in the machine dynamics [3] . The aim of the current study is to emphasize the effect of the loading system inertia of tribotester on wear behaviour of different tribo-pair combinations (ceramic–ceramic, ceramic–metal and/or metal–metal). Different devices with known machine characteristics are usually applied to study the effect of machine dynamics [3,5] while the same device allowing to change the inertia of the loading system was used in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tribology International Elsevier

Effect of loading system inertia on tribological behaviour of ceramic–ceramic, ceramic–metal and metal–metal dry sliding contacts

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-679X
eISSN
1879-2464
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.triboint.2013.03.025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Laboratory tribological testing can hardly completely simulate conditions experienced in service (real conditions) [1–7] . When two rough surfaces are in sliding contact then normal displacements occur and excitation of vibration takes place [2] . Level of vibration (displacement amplitude, velocity and acceleration) is affected by load, sliding speed, motion type, contact geometry, test environment, sample parameters (material composition, structure, surface finish, etc.) and characteristics of tribo-device (machine dynamics) resulting from design (stiffness of frame, sample fixation, etc.) and method of load application (dead weight, pneumatic or hydraulic, servo controlled, etc) [4] . A variations of nearly two orders of magnitude for ceramic–ceramic tribopair were seen in tests that were carried out under nominally identical conditions due to changes in the dominant wear mechanism promoted by the alteration in the machine dynamics [3] . The aim of the current study is to emphasize the effect of the loading system inertia of tribotester on wear behaviour of different tribo-pair combinations (ceramic–ceramic, ceramic–metal and/or metal–metal). Different devices with known machine characteristics are usually applied to study the effect of machine dynamics [3,5] while the same device allowing to change the inertia of the loading system was used in

Journal

Tribology InternationalElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2013

References

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