Effect of high CO 2 and controlled atmosphere (CA) on the ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid content of some berry fruits

Effect of high CO 2 and controlled atmosphere (CA) on the ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid... High CO 2 concentrations as well as controlled atmosphere storage are widely used to extend the storage and shelf-life of many fruits. To investigate the effect of these storage procedures on several berry fruits, strawberries, raspberries, currants and blackberries were stored at three different elevated CO 2 concentrations, with or without a parallel reduction in O 2 . Vitamin C content (ascorbic acid plus dehydroascorbic acid) was reduced by high CO 2 concentrations (10–30% CO 2 ), particularly in strawberries. This reduction in vitamin C was moderate in black currants and blackberries and almost absent in raspberries and red currants when compared with strawberries. Reducing the O 2 concentration in the storage atmosphere in the presence of high CO 2 had little effect on the vitamin C content. Ascorbic acid was more diminished at high CO 2 than dehydroascorbic acid. This suggests a stimulating effect of high CO 2 concentrations on the oxidation of ascorbic acid and/or an inhibition of mono- or dehydroascorbic acid reduction to ascorbic acid. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Postharvest Biology and Technology Elsevier

Effect of high CO 2 and controlled atmosphere (CA) on the ascorbic and dehydroascorbic acid content of some berry fruits

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0925-5214
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0925-5214(97)01414-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

High CO 2 concentrations as well as controlled atmosphere storage are widely used to extend the storage and shelf-life of many fruits. To investigate the effect of these storage procedures on several berry fruits, strawberries, raspberries, currants and blackberries were stored at three different elevated CO 2 concentrations, with or without a parallel reduction in O 2 . Vitamin C content (ascorbic acid plus dehydroascorbic acid) was reduced by high CO 2 concentrations (10–30% CO 2 ), particularly in strawberries. This reduction in vitamin C was moderate in black currants and blackberries and almost absent in raspberries and red currants when compared with strawberries. Reducing the O 2 concentration in the storage atmosphere in the presence of high CO 2 had little effect on the vitamin C content. Ascorbic acid was more diminished at high CO 2 than dehydroascorbic acid. This suggests a stimulating effect of high CO 2 concentrations on the oxidation of ascorbic acid and/or an inhibition of mono- or dehydroascorbic acid reduction to ascorbic acid.

Journal

Postharvest Biology and TechnologyElsevier

Published: May 1, 1997

References

  • Ethylene-enhanced 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase activity in ripening apples
    Bufler, G.
  • Oxygen activation and toxicity
    Elstner, E.F.
  • Ethylene-promoted ascorbate peroxidase activity protects plants against hydrogen peroxide, ozone and paraquat
    Mehlhorn, H.
  • Vitamins
    Watada, A.E.

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