Effect of Gender on Unplanned Readmissions After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Nationwide Readmissions Database)

Effect of Gender on Unplanned Readmissions After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the... Women who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are at higher risk of adverse outcomes compared with men, but it is unknown whether gender affects early unplanned rehospitalization. We analyzed 832,753 patients who underwent PCI from 2013 to 2014 in the Nationwide Readmissions Database. We compared gender differences in incidences, predictors, causes, and cost of unplanned 30-day readmissions and examined the effect of co-morbidity. A total of 832,753 men and women who survived the index PCI and were not admitted for a planned readmission were included in the analysis. Overall, 9.4% of patients had an unplanned readmission within 30 days. Thirty-day readmission rates were higher in women compared with men (11.5% vs 8.4%, p <0.001) even after multivariate adjustment (odds ratio 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 1.22, p <0.001), although women had significantly lower costs associated with the readmission ($11,927 vs $12,758, p <0.001). The cause of readmission for women and men were similar and the majority of the readmissions were due to noncardiac causes (58% vs 55%), the most common of which were nonspecific chest pain, gastrointestinal disease, and infections. In contrast, for cardiac readmissions, women are more likely to be readmitted for heart failure (29.64% vs 22.34%), whereas men are more likely to be readmitted for coronary artery disease, including angina (33.47% vs 28.54%). In conclusion, gender disparities exist in rates of unplanned rehospitalization after PCI, where more than 1 in 10 women who undergo PCI are readmitted within 30 days. Gender differences were not observed for causes of noncardiac readmissions, whereas important differences were observed for cardiovascular causes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Cardiology Elsevier

Effect of Gender on Unplanned Readmissions After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Nationwide Readmissions Database)

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0002-9149
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.amjcard.2017.12.032
Publisher site
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Abstract

Women who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are at higher risk of adverse outcomes compared with men, but it is unknown whether gender affects early unplanned rehospitalization. We analyzed 832,753 patients who underwent PCI from 2013 to 2014 in the Nationwide Readmissions Database. We compared gender differences in incidences, predictors, causes, and cost of unplanned 30-day readmissions and examined the effect of co-morbidity. A total of 832,753 men and women who survived the index PCI and were not admitted for a planned readmission were included in the analysis. Overall, 9.4% of patients had an unplanned readmission within 30 days. Thirty-day readmission rates were higher in women compared with men (11.5% vs 8.4%, p <0.001) even after multivariate adjustment (odds ratio 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 1.22, p <0.001), although women had significantly lower costs associated with the readmission ($11,927 vs $12,758, p <0.001). The cause of readmission for women and men were similar and the majority of the readmissions were due to noncardiac causes (58% vs 55%), the most common of which were nonspecific chest pain, gastrointestinal disease, and infections. In contrast, for cardiac readmissions, women are more likely to be readmitted for heart failure (29.64% vs 22.34%), whereas men are more likely to be readmitted for coronary artery disease, including angina (33.47% vs 28.54%). In conclusion, gender disparities exist in rates of unplanned rehospitalization after PCI, where more than 1 in 10 women who undergo PCI are readmitted within 30 days. Gender differences were not observed for causes of noncardiac readmissions, whereas important differences were observed for cardiovascular causes.

Journal

The American Journal of CardiologyElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

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