Effect of electrolytic and neurotoxic lesions of the median raphe nucleus on anxiety and stress

Effect of electrolytic and neurotoxic lesions of the median raphe nucleus on anxiety and stress To study the role played by 5-HT mechanisms of the MRN, behavioural and physiological parameters were presently measured in rats having either electrolytic or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) lesion of the MRN made 7 days before testing. Half the animals were submitted to 2-h restraint 24 h before the test. In the elevated plus-maze, the electrolytic lesion increased the percentage of open-arm entries and of time spent on open arms — an anxiolytic effect — in both restrained and nonrestrained rats. The neurotoxic lesion had a similar effect, but only on restrained rats. Restraint had anxiogenic effect. The electrolytic lesion increased transitions between the light and dark compartments and the time spent in the bright compartment of the light–dark box in both restrained and nonrestrained rats. The neurotoxic lesion only increased bright time in restrained rats. The incidence, number and size of gastric ulcers were increased by either the electrolytic or the neurotoxic lesion in both restrained and nonrestrained animals. Both types of lesion depleted 5-HT in the hippocampus in restrained and nonrestrained rats. Restraint increased 5-HT levels. These results implicate 5-HT mechanisms of the median raphe nucleus in the regulation of anxiety and in the genesis of gastric stress ulcers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior Elsevier

Effect of electrolytic and neurotoxic lesions of the median raphe nucleus on anxiety and stress

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.
ISSN
0091-3057
eISSN
1873-5177
DOI
10.1016/S0091-3057(01)00512-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To study the role played by 5-HT mechanisms of the MRN, behavioural and physiological parameters were presently measured in rats having either electrolytic or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) lesion of the MRN made 7 days before testing. Half the animals were submitted to 2-h restraint 24 h before the test. In the elevated plus-maze, the electrolytic lesion increased the percentage of open-arm entries and of time spent on open arms — an anxiolytic effect — in both restrained and nonrestrained rats. The neurotoxic lesion had a similar effect, but only on restrained rats. Restraint had anxiogenic effect. The electrolytic lesion increased transitions between the light and dark compartments and the time spent in the bright compartment of the light–dark box in both restrained and nonrestrained rats. The neurotoxic lesion only increased bright time in restrained rats. The incidence, number and size of gastric ulcers were increased by either the electrolytic or the neurotoxic lesion in both restrained and nonrestrained animals. Both types of lesion depleted 5-HT in the hippocampus in restrained and nonrestrained rats. Restraint increased 5-HT levels. These results implicate 5-HT mechanisms of the median raphe nucleus in the regulation of anxiety and in the genesis of gastric stress ulcers.

Journal

Pharmacology Biochemistry and BehaviorElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2001

References

  • Regulation of contextual conditioning by median raphe nucleus
    Avanzi, VL; Castilho, V; Andrade, TGCS; Brandão, ML
  • Effect of serotonergic lesion on anxious behaviour measured in the elevated plus-maze test in the rat
    Briley, M; Chopin, P; Moret, C
  • Evidence that central 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neurons are involved in the anxiolytic activity of buspirone
    Carli, M; Prontera, C; Samanin, R
  • The influence of open arm ledges and maze experience in the elevated plus-maze
    Fernandes, C; File, SE
  • Role of 5-HT in stress, anxiety and depression
    Graeff, FG; Guimarães, FS; Andrade, TGCS; Deakin, JFW
  • The neuropsychology of anxiety
    Gray, JA
  • The serotonergic and noradrenergic systems of the hippocampus: their interactions and the effects of antidepressant treatments
    Mongeau, R; Blier, P; Montigny, C

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