Effect of double pressing/double sintering on the sliding wear of self-lubricating sintered composites

Effect of double pressing/double sintering on the sliding wear of self-lubricating sintered... 1 Introduction</h5> The production of high-performance self-lubricating composites containing second-phase particles incorporated into their volume is a promising technique for controlling friction and wear in modern energy-efficient mechanical systems [1–5] .</P>Composite self-lubricating components have been used for several decades in household and light office equipment such as printers, electric shavers, drills and blenders. There are several possible manufacturing routes for producing such composites, in polymeric, metallic or even ceramic matrices [6–8] . The most frequently used metallic matrix materials are copper [9] , nickel [10] and ferrous [11,12] alloys. Compounds such as MoS 2 , WS 2 , MoSe 2 , NbS 2 , TaSe 2 , MoTe 2 , h-BN, low-melting metals such as Ag, Sn and Pb, graphite and polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) are most frequently used as solid lubricants [2,3,13,14] . The majority of the composites developed in the past contained a high percentage of solid lubricant particles (15–40%) to obtain a low friction coefficient. This resulted in a largely discontinuous metallic matrix that exhibited poor mechanical properties.</P>Fig. 1 presents a schematic drawing of the ideal microstructure of a self-lubricating composite. The microstructure must consist of a continuous matrix containing regularly dispersed solid lubricant particles and take http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tribology International Elsevier

Effect of double pressing/double sintering on the sliding wear of self-lubricating sintered composites

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-679X
eISSN
1879-2464
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.triboint.2013.09.016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The production of high-performance self-lubricating composites containing second-phase particles incorporated into their volume is a promising technique for controlling friction and wear in modern energy-efficient mechanical systems [1–5] .</P>Composite self-lubricating components have been used for several decades in household and light office equipment such as printers, electric shavers, drills and blenders. There are several possible manufacturing routes for producing such composites, in polymeric, metallic or even ceramic matrices [6–8] . The most frequently used metallic matrix materials are copper [9] , nickel [10] and ferrous [11,12] alloys. Compounds such as MoS 2 , WS 2 , MoSe 2 , NbS 2 , TaSe 2 , MoTe 2 , h-BN, low-melting metals such as Ag, Sn and Pb, graphite and polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) are most frequently used as solid lubricants [2,3,13,14] . The majority of the composites developed in the past contained a high percentage of solid lubricant particles (15–40%) to obtain a low friction coefficient. This resulted in a largely discontinuous metallic matrix that exhibited poor mechanical properties.</P>Fig. 1 presents a schematic drawing of the ideal microstructure of a self-lubricating composite. The microstructure must consist of a continuous matrix containing regularly dispersed solid lubricant particles and take

Journal

Tribology InternationalElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2014

References

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