Ecological restoration at Mainland Islands in New Zealand

Ecological restoration at Mainland Islands in New Zealand While important advances have been made in recovering threatened species and restoring damaged habitats on offshore islands, effective conservation management is also required on the main (North and South) islands if representative elements of New Zealand's remaining biodiversity are to be protected. The recent initiation of Mainland Island projects constitutes an important step in that ecosystem-focused restoration goals are being pursued at mainland sites. The intensity and scope of pest control undertaken at Mainland Islands is greater than has normally been the case previously, as has been monitoring of results and conservation outcomes. Preliminary results suggest that declines in monitored species have been arrested and ecological processes re-vitalised. In addition to restoring values at individual sites Mainland Islands may be important places where our capacity to manage ecosystems more generally may be developed. Advances in our understanding of ecological processes and of responses to management using sound scientific procedures as part of operational programmes could lead to improved predictions to underpin management decisions. Refinements to management techniques and the development of appropriate skills, as well as enhancing public support and involvement could also be expected to have major benefits for conservation management more widely. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Ecological restoration at Mainland Islands in New Zealand

Biological Conservation, Volume 99 (1) – May 1, 2001

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
DOI
10.1016/S0006-3207(00)00192-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While important advances have been made in recovering threatened species and restoring damaged habitats on offshore islands, effective conservation management is also required on the main (North and South) islands if representative elements of New Zealand's remaining biodiversity are to be protected. The recent initiation of Mainland Island projects constitutes an important step in that ecosystem-focused restoration goals are being pursued at mainland sites. The intensity and scope of pest control undertaken at Mainland Islands is greater than has normally been the case previously, as has been monitoring of results and conservation outcomes. Preliminary results suggest that declines in monitored species have been arrested and ecological processes re-vitalised. In addition to restoring values at individual sites Mainland Islands may be important places where our capacity to manage ecosystems more generally may be developed. Advances in our understanding of ecological processes and of responses to management using sound scientific procedures as part of operational programmes could lead to improved predictions to underpin management decisions. Refinements to management techniques and the development of appropriate skills, as well as enhancing public support and involvement could also be expected to have major benefits for conservation management more widely.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: May 1, 2001

References

  • An evaluation of representativeness for nature conservation, Hokitika ecological district, New Zealand
    Awimbo, J.A; Norton, D.A; Overmars, F.B
  • The ecological consequences of social wasps ( Vespula spp.) invading an ecosystem that has an abundant carbohydrate resource
    Beggs, J
  • Trilepidea adamsii
    Norton, D.A
  • Factors predisposing forests to canopy collapse in the southern Ruahine Range, New Zealand
    Rogers, G.M; Leathwick, J.R
  • The role of introduced predators and competitors in the decline of kaka ( Nestor meridionalis ) populations in New Zealand
    Wilson, P.R; Karl, B.J; Toff, R.J; Beggs, J.R; Taylor, R.H

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