Ecological aspects and potential impacts of the non-native hydromedusa Blackfordia virginica in a temperate estuary

Ecological aspects and potential impacts of the non-native hydromedusa Blackfordia virginica in a... The hydrozoan Blackfordia virginica has been reported over a wide geographical area, although it is mainly restricted to scattered records within estuarine areas of temperate and tropical regions. The aim of this study was to understand the spatial and temporal variability of an established population of this non-indigenous species on a temperate estuarine ecosystem, and its impacts over the plankton community. Sampling was conducted from 2011 to 2013 in the Mira estuary (Portugal) and higher densities were observed during the summer of 2013, with a maximum of 1689.3 medusae.m−3. Spatially, higher abundances of medusae were associated with sites of higher abundance of oyster shells and higher percentage of hard substrate in the river bed. Smaller jellyfish were sampled in the vicinity of these hard substrate locations, suggesting these might be habitats for polyp fixation. A higher potential predation impact on the copepod population along the estuary was estimated for the summer of 2013, with a median half life of 6.1 days. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science Elsevier

Ecological aspects and potential impacts of the non-native hydromedusa Blackfordia virginica in a temperate estuary

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/ecological-aspects-and-potential-impacts-of-the-non-native-hydromedusa-fXegkuBfCd
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0272-7714
eISSN
1096-0015
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecss.2017.08.015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The hydrozoan Blackfordia virginica has been reported over a wide geographical area, although it is mainly restricted to scattered records within estuarine areas of temperate and tropical regions. The aim of this study was to understand the spatial and temporal variability of an established population of this non-indigenous species on a temperate estuarine ecosystem, and its impacts over the plankton community. Sampling was conducted from 2011 to 2013 in the Mira estuary (Portugal) and higher densities were observed during the summer of 2013, with a maximum of 1689.3 medusae.m−3. Spatially, higher abundances of medusae were associated with sites of higher abundance of oyster shells and higher percentage of hard substrate in the river bed. Smaller jellyfish were sampled in the vicinity of these hard substrate locations, suggesting these might be habitats for polyp fixation. A higher potential predation impact on the copepod population along the estuary was estimated for the summer of 2013, with a median half life of 6.1 days.

Journal

Estuarine Coastal and Shelf ScienceElsevier

Published: Oct 15, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off