Eccrinales (Trichomycetes) are not fungi, but a clade of protists at the early divergence of animals and fungi

Eccrinales (Trichomycetes) are not fungi, but a clade of protists at the early divergence of... The morphologically diverse orders Eccrinales and Amoebidiales have been considered members of the fungal class Trichomycetes (Zygomycota) for the last 50 years. These organisms either inhabit the gut or are ectocommensals on the exoskeleton of a wide range of arthropods—Crustacea, Insecta, and Diplopoda—in varied habitats. The taxonomy of both orders is based on a few micromorphological characters. One species, Amoebidium parasiticum , has been axenically cultured and this has permitted several biochemical and phylogenetic analyses. As a consequence, the order Amoebidiales has been removed from the Trichomycetes and placed in the class Mesomycetozoea. An affinity between Eccrinales and Amoebidiales was first suggested when the class Trichomycetes was erected by Duboscq et al. (Arch. Zool. Exp. Gen. 86 (1948) 29). Subsequently, molecular markers have been developed to study the relationship of these orders to other groups. Ribosomal gene (18S and 28S) sequence analyses generated by this study do not support a close association of these orders to the Trichomycetes or to other fungi. Rather, Eccrinales share a common ancestry with the Amoebidiales and belong to the protist class Mesomycetozoea, placed at the animal–fungi boundary. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution Elsevier

Eccrinales (Trichomycetes) are not fungi, but a clade of protists at the early divergence of animals and fungi

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
1055-7903
eISSN
1095-9513
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ympev.2004.12.019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The morphologically diverse orders Eccrinales and Amoebidiales have been considered members of the fungal class Trichomycetes (Zygomycota) for the last 50 years. These organisms either inhabit the gut or are ectocommensals on the exoskeleton of a wide range of arthropods—Crustacea, Insecta, and Diplopoda—in varied habitats. The taxonomy of both orders is based on a few micromorphological characters. One species, Amoebidium parasiticum , has been axenically cultured and this has permitted several biochemical and phylogenetic analyses. As a consequence, the order Amoebidiales has been removed from the Trichomycetes and placed in the class Mesomycetozoea. An affinity between Eccrinales and Amoebidiales was first suggested when the class Trichomycetes was erected by Duboscq et al. (Arch. Zool. Exp. Gen. 86 (1948) 29). Subsequently, molecular markers have been developed to study the relationship of these orders to other groups. Ribosomal gene (18S and 28S) sequence analyses generated by this study do not support a close association of these orders to the Trichomycetes or to other fungi. Rather, Eccrinales share a common ancestry with the Amoebidiales and belong to the protist class Mesomycetozoea, placed at the animal–fungi boundary.

Journal

Molecular Phylogenetics and EvolutionElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2005

References

  • Enzymatic approach to fungal association with arthropod guts: a case study for the crustacean host, Nihonotrypaea harmandi , and its foregut fungus, Enteromyces callianassae
    Kimura, H.; Harada, K.; Hara, K.; Tamaki, A.
  • The closest unicellular relatives of animals
    Lang, B.F.; O’Kelly, C.; Nerad, T.; Gray, M.W.; Burger, G.
  • Modeltest: testing the model of DNA substitution
    Posada, D.; Crandall, K.A.
  • Morphology of Ichthyophonus hoferi assessed by light and scanning electron microscopy
    Spanggaard, B.; Huss, H.H.; Brescianni, J.
  • Phylogenetic relationships of the intercellular fish pathogen Ichthyophonus hoferi , and fungi, choanoflagellates and the rosette agent
    Spanggaard, B.; Skouboe, P.; Rossen, L.; Taylor, J.W.

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