Early–middle Holocene lake-desert evolution in northern Ulan Buh Desert, China

Early–middle Holocene lake-desert evolution in northern Ulan Buh Desert, China Located in southwestern Inner Mongolia in northern China, the Ulan Buh Desert (UBD) has evolved significantly during the Holocene. The northern desert is adjacent to Hetao Plain, an important agriculture area since the Han Dynasty (~ 200 B.C.). A series of aeolian sand–lacustrine sequences from the desert were measured and dated by using differential global positioning system (DGPS) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technologies respectively. These lacustrine remains with similar deposit sequences have almost identical elevations and depositional ages, indicating that they belonged to a unified paleolake. In addition, the Holocene paleolake/desert evolution process in UBD is established. Aeolian activity prevailed before ~ 8.3 ka, and a unified Ulan Buh Paleolake containing the modern Jilantai Salt Lake covered the northern desert during 7.8–7.1 ka ago. The paleolake shrank and broke apart after 6.5 ka ago. Thereafter, the paleolake evolved into the modern UBD and Jilantai Salt Lake. The study of one sand–lacustrine section at the southern edge of Hetao Plain shows that the Tushenze Paleolake had a similar evolution process to Ulan Buh Paleolake, though they may not be connected to each other, as suggested by the elevation difference. The Ulan Buh desert–lake evolution was likely due to the climate changes in the monsoon-influenced region during the early–middle Holocene. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology" Elsevier

Early–middle Holocene lake-desert evolution in northern Ulan Buh Desert, China

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/early-middle-holocene-lake-desert-evolution-in-northern-ulan-buh-dt8akxx7Hy
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0031-0182
eISSN
1872-616X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.palaeo.2012.02.027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Located in southwestern Inner Mongolia in northern China, the Ulan Buh Desert (UBD) has evolved significantly during the Holocene. The northern desert is adjacent to Hetao Plain, an important agriculture area since the Han Dynasty (~ 200 B.C.). A series of aeolian sand–lacustrine sequences from the desert were measured and dated by using differential global positioning system (DGPS) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technologies respectively. These lacustrine remains with similar deposit sequences have almost identical elevations and depositional ages, indicating that they belonged to a unified paleolake. In addition, the Holocene paleolake/desert evolution process in UBD is established. Aeolian activity prevailed before ~ 8.3 ka, and a unified Ulan Buh Paleolake containing the modern Jilantai Salt Lake covered the northern desert during 7.8–7.1 ka ago. The paleolake shrank and broke apart after 6.5 ka ago. Thereafter, the paleolake evolved into the modern UBD and Jilantai Salt Lake. The study of one sand–lacustrine section at the southern edge of Hetao Plain shows that the Tushenze Paleolake had a similar evolution process to Ulan Buh Paleolake, though they may not be connected to each other, as suggested by the elevation difference. The Ulan Buh desert–lake evolution was likely due to the climate changes in the monsoon-influenced region during the early–middle Holocene.

Journal

"Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology"Elsevier

Published: May 1, 2012

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off