Dynamics of bacterial colonisation in the respiratory tract of patients with cystic fibrosis

Dynamics of bacterial colonisation in the respiratory tract of patients with cystic fibrosis Mutations in the human genome may result in altered phenotypes. The cystic fibrosis (CF) patient, for instance, suffers from an aberrant composition of the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tract. In this particular case, a single point mutation in the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator (CFTR) gene results in major physiological changes resulting in ecological changes that generate a niche particularly attractive to a selected set of microbial pathogens. We here present a review on the dynamics of the bacterial populations inhabiting the CF lung. Studies focusing on Staphylococcus aureus , Haemophilus influenzae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa will be summarised and discussed, whereas the technology used for microbial characterisation will be shortly highlighted. Emphasis, however, will be on those studies that assessed the genetic diversity among clinical isolates that were obtained over prolonged periods of time, enabling the distinction between persistent colonisation versus frequent re-infection by the selected pathogens. Evolutionary adaptation of pathogens to the CF lung is a common theme in many of these studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Infection, Genetics and Evolution Elsevier

Dynamics of bacterial colonisation in the respiratory tract of patients with cystic fibrosis

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
1567-1348
DOI
10.1016/S1567-1348(01)00004-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mutations in the human genome may result in altered phenotypes. The cystic fibrosis (CF) patient, for instance, suffers from an aberrant composition of the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tract. In this particular case, a single point mutation in the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator (CFTR) gene results in major physiological changes resulting in ecological changes that generate a niche particularly attractive to a selected set of microbial pathogens. We here present a review on the dynamics of the bacterial populations inhabiting the CF lung. Studies focusing on Staphylococcus aureus , Haemophilus influenzae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa will be summarised and discussed, whereas the technology used for microbial characterisation will be shortly highlighted. Emphasis, however, will be on those studies that assessed the genetic diversity among clinical isolates that were obtained over prolonged periods of time, enabling the distinction between persistent colonisation versus frequent re-infection by the selected pathogens. Evolutionary adaptation of pathogens to the CF lung is a common theme in many of these studies.

Journal

Infection, Genetics and EvolutionElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2001

References

  • Detection of bacteraemia in patients with fever and neutropenia using 16S rRNA gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction
    Ley, B.E.; Linton, C.J.; Bennett, D.M.; Jalal, H.; Foot, A.B.; Millar, M.R.
  • Cystic fibrosis: a multiple exocrinopathy caused by dysfunctions in a multifunctional transport protein
    Schwiebert, E.M.; Benos, D.J.; Fuller, C.M.
  • Cystic fibrosis in The Netherlands
    Ten Kate, L.P.
  • Cystic fibrosis: a review of pulmonary infections and interventions
    Thomassen, M.J.; Demko, C.A.; Doershuk, C.F.
  • Comparison of conventional and molecular methods for the detection of bacterial pathogens in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis patients
    Van Belkum, A.; Renders, N.H.M.; Smith, S.; Overbeek, S.E.; Verbrugh, H.A.

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