Dynamic mRNA Transport and Local Translation in Radial Glial Progenitors of the Developing Brain

Dynamic mRNA Transport and Local Translation in Radial Glial Progenitors of the Developing Brain In the developing brain, neurons are produced from neural stem cells termed radial glia [1, 2]. Radial glial progenitors span the neuroepithelium, extending long basal processes to form endfeet hundreds of micrometers away from the soma. Basal structures influence neuronal migration, tissue integrity, and proliferation [3–7]. Yet, despite the significance of these distal structures, their cell biology remains poorly characterized, impeding our understanding of how basal processes and endfeet influence neurogenesis. Here we use live imaging of embryonic brain tissue to visualize, for the first time, rapid mRNA transport in radial glia, revealing that the basal process is a highway for directed molecular transport. RNA- and mRNA-binding proteins, including the syndromic autism protein FMRP, move in basal processes at velocities consistent with microtubule-based transport, accumulating in endfeet. We develop an ex vivo tissue preparation to mechanically isolate radial glia endfeet from the soma, and we use photoconvertible proteins to demonstrate that mRNA is locally translated. Using RNA immunoprecipitation and microarray analyses of endfeet, we discover FMRP-bound transcripts, which encode signaling and cytoskeletal regulators, including many implicated in autism and neurogenesis. We show FMRP controls transport and localization of one target, Kif26a. These discoveries reveal a rich, regulated local transcriptome in radial glia, far from the soma, and establish a tractable mammalian model for studying mRNA transport and local translation in vivo. We conclude that cytoskeletal and signaling events at endfeet may be controlled through translation of specific mRNAs transported from the soma, exposing new mechanistic layers within stem cells of the developing brain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Biology Elsevier

Dynamic mRNA Transport and Local Translation in Radial Glial Progenitors of the Developing Brain

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/dynamic-mrna-transport-and-local-translation-in-radial-glial-ebcSaNsYba
Publisher
Cell Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0960-9822
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the developing brain, neurons are produced from neural stem cells termed radial glia [1, 2]. Radial glial progenitors span the neuroepithelium, extending long basal processes to form endfeet hundreds of micrometers away from the soma. Basal structures influence neuronal migration, tissue integrity, and proliferation [3–7]. Yet, despite the significance of these distal structures, their cell biology remains poorly characterized, impeding our understanding of how basal processes and endfeet influence neurogenesis. Here we use live imaging of embryonic brain tissue to visualize, for the first time, rapid mRNA transport in radial glia, revealing that the basal process is a highway for directed molecular transport. RNA- and mRNA-binding proteins, including the syndromic autism protein FMRP, move in basal processes at velocities consistent with microtubule-based transport, accumulating in endfeet. We develop an ex vivo tissue preparation to mechanically isolate radial glia endfeet from the soma, and we use photoconvertible proteins to demonstrate that mRNA is locally translated. Using RNA immunoprecipitation and microarray analyses of endfeet, we discover FMRP-bound transcripts, which encode signaling and cytoskeletal regulators, including many implicated in autism and neurogenesis. We show FMRP controls transport and localization of one target, Kif26a. These discoveries reveal a rich, regulated local transcriptome in radial glia, far from the soma, and establish a tractable mammalian model for studying mRNA transport and local translation in vivo. We conclude that cytoskeletal and signaling events at endfeet may be controlled through translation of specific mRNAs transported from the soma, exposing new mechanistic layers within stem cells of the developing brain.

Journal

Current BiologyElsevier

Published: Dec 19, 2016

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off