Drugs and the dance music scene: a survey of current drug use patterns among a sample of dance music enthusiasts in the UK

Drugs and the dance music scene: a survey of current drug use patterns among a sample of dance... This study explores the utility of a self-completion survey method to quickly and cheaply generate information on patterns and trends among regular ‘recreational’ drug consumers. Data is reported here from 1151 subjects accessed through a dance music publication. In keeping with previous studies of drug use within the dance scene polysubstance use was the norm. Many of those reporting use of ‘ecstasy’ were regularly using multiple tablets often consumed in combination with other substances thus exposing themselves to serious health risks, in particular the risk of dose related neurotoxic effects. Seventy percent were drinking alcohol at hazardous levels. Subjects' patterns of drug purchasing also put them at risk of severe criminal sanction. Data supported evidence that cocaine use had become increasing popular in the UK, but contrasted with some commentators' views that ecstasy use was in decline. The utility of this method and how the results should be interpreted is discussed, as are the data's implications for harm and risk reduction activities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Drug and Alcohol Dependence Elsevier

Drugs and the dance music scene: a survey of current drug use patterns among a sample of dance music enthusiasts in the UK

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd
ISSN
0376-8716
DOI
10.1016/S0376-8716(00)00215-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study explores the utility of a self-completion survey method to quickly and cheaply generate information on patterns and trends among regular ‘recreational’ drug consumers. Data is reported here from 1151 subjects accessed through a dance music publication. In keeping with previous studies of drug use within the dance scene polysubstance use was the norm. Many of those reporting use of ‘ecstasy’ were regularly using multiple tablets often consumed in combination with other substances thus exposing themselves to serious health risks, in particular the risk of dose related neurotoxic effects. Seventy percent were drinking alcohol at hazardous levels. Subjects' patterns of drug purchasing also put them at risk of severe criminal sanction. Data supported evidence that cocaine use had become increasing popular in the UK, but contrasted with some commentators' views that ecstasy use was in decline. The utility of this method and how the results should be interpreted is discussed, as are the data's implications for harm and risk reduction activities.

Journal

Drug and Alcohol DependenceElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2001

References

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