Dr. John James Wymer (1928–2006)

Dr. John James Wymer (1928–2006) The death of John Wymer on 10th February 2006 saw the passing of a man who made an outstanding contribution to Palaeolithic Archaeology. Furthermore, he made these contributions from outside the usual pathway of academia. In 1955, John was involved in an excavation at Swanscombe, a locality southeast of London in the lower Thames valley. During his careful excavation he unearthed a substantial fragment of skull of a fossil hominid which remains the oldest human cranium from Britain. In 2000, he was amongst members of the Quaternary Research Association when a human struck flake was discovered at Pakefield, a sea cliff section in eastern England, and it was he who alerted members to the importance of this small piece of rock. It was the discovery of this fragment, and other discoveries made by John, that stimulated the investigation that lead to the discovery of evidence for the earliest humans in northern Europe, some 700,000 years ago—that is, some 200,000 years earlier than previously believed, and lead to the publication in Nature in December 2005. In between these outstanding discoveries John carried out a continuous programme of research, based on his immaculate field investigation and funded by a variety http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quaternary Science Reviews Elsevier

Dr. John James Wymer (1928–2006)

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0277-3791
eISSN
1873-457X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.quascirev.2006.04.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The death of John Wymer on 10th February 2006 saw the passing of a man who made an outstanding contribution to Palaeolithic Archaeology. Furthermore, he made these contributions from outside the usual pathway of academia. In 1955, John was involved in an excavation at Swanscombe, a locality southeast of London in the lower Thames valley. During his careful excavation he unearthed a substantial fragment of skull of a fossil hominid which remains the oldest human cranium from Britain. In 2000, he was amongst members of the Quaternary Research Association when a human struck flake was discovered at Pakefield, a sea cliff section in eastern England, and it was he who alerted members to the importance of this small piece of rock. It was the discovery of this fragment, and other discoveries made by John, that stimulated the investigation that lead to the discovery of evidence for the earliest humans in northern Europe, some 700,000 years ago—that is, some 200,000 years earlier than previously believed, and lead to the publication in Nature in December 2005. In between these outstanding discoveries John carried out a continuous programme of research, based on his immaculate field investigation and funded by a variety

Journal

Quaternary Science ReviewsElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2006

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