Double up! Examining the effects of adding inhibition training to food cue exposure in chocolate-loving female students

Double up! Examining the effects of adding inhibition training to food cue exposure in... In the present we study investigated whether addition of a Go/No Go training enhanced the effects of food cue exposure. We assessed desire to eat, salivation, CS-US expectancies, and eating in the absence of hunger (EAH) during and after cue exposure. Participants (N = 71) were chocolate-loving female students who tried to eat less chocolate in daily life. They received two sessions of either cue exposure with Go/No Go training (EXP + GNG), cue exposure with a sham training (EXP + shamGNG), or a control procedure with sham training (CON + shamGNG). Results showed that the exposure groups had higher desire to eat and higher levels of salivation during exposure compared to the control group during the control intervention, and that within session and between session habituation occurred in all conditions. In contrast to our hypotheses, lower levels of desire and salivation in the EXP + GNG compared to the EXP + shamGNG group at the end of exposure were not found. In addition, there was an overall decrease in CS-US expectancies with no group differences, and these beliefs were unrelated to EAH. Furthermore, groups did not differ on intake of either the exposed chocolate, non-exposed chocolate or other snack food items. It is concluded that a short Go/No Go training does not have an effect on two sessions of cue exposure treatment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Appetite Elsevier

Double up! Examining the effects of adding inhibition training to food cue exposure in chocolate-loving female students

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/double-up-examining-the-effects-of-adding-inhibition-training-to-food-6FIFNxHSoY
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0195-6663
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.appet.2017.11.096
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the present we study investigated whether addition of a Go/No Go training enhanced the effects of food cue exposure. We assessed desire to eat, salivation, CS-US expectancies, and eating in the absence of hunger (EAH) during and after cue exposure. Participants (N = 71) were chocolate-loving female students who tried to eat less chocolate in daily life. They received two sessions of either cue exposure with Go/No Go training (EXP + GNG), cue exposure with a sham training (EXP + shamGNG), or a control procedure with sham training (CON + shamGNG). Results showed that the exposure groups had higher desire to eat and higher levels of salivation during exposure compared to the control group during the control intervention, and that within session and between session habituation occurred in all conditions. In contrast to our hypotheses, lower levels of desire and salivation in the EXP + GNG compared to the EXP + shamGNG group at the end of exposure were not found. In addition, there was an overall decrease in CS-US expectancies with no group differences, and these beliefs were unrelated to EAH. Furthermore, groups did not differ on intake of either the exposed chocolate, non-exposed chocolate or other snack food items. It is concluded that a short Go/No Go training does not have an effect on two sessions of cue exposure treatment.

Journal

AppetiteElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off