Dominant frequency of songs in tropical bird species is higher in sites with high noise pollution

Dominant frequency of songs in tropical bird species is higher in sites with high noise pollution The structure and organization of acoustic signals arise through evolutionary processes and adaptive pressures on each species. During learning, natural or anthropogenic factors, such as high noise levels in urban areas, pose challenges to acoustic communication in birds. Many species adjust their acoustic signals to higher noise levels by increasing the frequency of vocalizations. The objectives of this study were to compare the dominant frequency of songs among birds dwelling in forest fragments distant from and near to urban areas, establish correlations between the dominant frequency of song and noise levels in these environments and verified the difference of response between oscines, suboscines and non-passerines. We recorded vocalizations of birds between July/2013 and November/2014 in four forest fragments, two of them near and two distant from urban areas. We used Audacity software to measure the dominant frequency. We measured the ambient noise by a calibrated sound pressure level meter in decibels (dBA) in each of the forest fragments. We analyzed 3740 vocalizations of nine tropical bird species. Forest fragments near to urban areas have higher noise levels than more distant forest fragments. Eight of nine studied species presented higher dominant frequencies of songs in forest fragments near to urban areas. Only one species, Myiothlypis flaveola, did not change the dominant frequency of song between the four analyzed forest fragments. The difference in dominant frequency between the forest fragments distant and closer to the urban areas did not vary between oscines, suboscines and non-passerines. Eight tropical birds exhibited higher dominant frequencies of song in forest fragments near urban areas with high level of ambient noise. Oscine, suboscine and non-passerine showed song variations. Bird species that have differences in the vocalization dominant frequency can be used in environmental monitoring and in ethological studies, as they are sensitive to high noise levels.Noise pollution caused by the vehicular traffic and urbanization are correlates with changes in the vocalization of tropical birds in forest fragments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Dominant frequency of songs in tropical bird species is higher in sites with high noise pollution

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/dominant-frequency-of-songs-in-tropical-bird-species-is-higher-in-JJIrT1oQ1d
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2018.01.045
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The structure and organization of acoustic signals arise through evolutionary processes and adaptive pressures on each species. During learning, natural or anthropogenic factors, such as high noise levels in urban areas, pose challenges to acoustic communication in birds. Many species adjust their acoustic signals to higher noise levels by increasing the frequency of vocalizations. The objectives of this study were to compare the dominant frequency of songs among birds dwelling in forest fragments distant from and near to urban areas, establish correlations between the dominant frequency of song and noise levels in these environments and verified the difference of response between oscines, suboscines and non-passerines. We recorded vocalizations of birds between July/2013 and November/2014 in four forest fragments, two of them near and two distant from urban areas. We used Audacity software to measure the dominant frequency. We measured the ambient noise by a calibrated sound pressure level meter in decibels (dBA) in each of the forest fragments. We analyzed 3740 vocalizations of nine tropical bird species. Forest fragments near to urban areas have higher noise levels than more distant forest fragments. Eight of nine studied species presented higher dominant frequencies of songs in forest fragments near to urban areas. Only one species, Myiothlypis flaveola, did not change the dominant frequency of song between the four analyzed forest fragments. The difference in dominant frequency between the forest fragments distant and closer to the urban areas did not vary between oscines, suboscines and non-passerines. Eight tropical birds exhibited higher dominant frequencies of song in forest fragments near urban areas with high level of ambient noise. Oscine, suboscine and non-passerine showed song variations. Bird species that have differences in the vocalization dominant frequency can be used in environmental monitoring and in ethological studies, as they are sensitive to high noise levels.Noise pollution caused by the vehicular traffic and urbanization are correlates with changes in the vocalization of tropical birds in forest fragments.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Access to DeepDyve database
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off