Does the occupant behavior match the energy concept of the building? – Analysis of a German naturally ventilated office building

Does the occupant behavior match the energy concept of the building? – Analysis of a German... 1 Introduction</h5> Office buildings represent an important part of our living environment. With respect to energy consumption, occupant satisfaction and behavior are worthwhile issues in the context of the performance of sustainable office buildings [1–5] . Experiences show that there is often a large gap between the predicted energy demand based on simulation and the consumption during the day-to-day operation once the building is in use. Several studies [6,7] report that occupant behaviors significantly affect the energy demand of buildings (ranging from 1.2 to 2.84 times when comparing identical buildings). Within the complex bundle of aspects such as design, construction, operation, maintenance and occupants’ expectations, the occupant behavior might not fit with the energy concept and cause counterproductive behavior. The “Desire for Control” [8] over ambient environmental conditions such as temperature or indoor air quality however has a strong impact on the well-being of the employees [9] . The understanding of the relationship between building and user behavior therefore plays an important role in the consideration of the energy consumption. Thus, the focus of this work is to explore patterns of energy-related behavior such as window-opening at the workplace, which is the most favorite taken adaptive opportunity [10] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Building and Environment Elsevier

Does the occupant behavior match the energy concept of the building? – Analysis of a German naturally ventilated office building

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0360-1323
DOI
10.1016/j.buildenv.2014.10.018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Office buildings represent an important part of our living environment. With respect to energy consumption, occupant satisfaction and behavior are worthwhile issues in the context of the performance of sustainable office buildings [1–5] . Experiences show that there is often a large gap between the predicted energy demand based on simulation and the consumption during the day-to-day operation once the building is in use. Several studies [6,7] report that occupant behaviors significantly affect the energy demand of buildings (ranging from 1.2 to 2.84 times when comparing identical buildings). Within the complex bundle of aspects such as design, construction, operation, maintenance and occupants’ expectations, the occupant behavior might not fit with the energy concept and cause counterproductive behavior. The “Desire for Control” [8] over ambient environmental conditions such as temperature or indoor air quality however has a strong impact on the well-being of the employees [9] . The understanding of the relationship between building and user behavior therefore plays an important role in the consideration of the energy consumption. Thus, the focus of this work is to explore patterns of energy-related behavior such as window-opening at the workplace, which is the most favorite taken adaptive opportunity [10]

Journal

Building and EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2015

References

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