Does the cost of a meal influence the portion size effect?

Does the cost of a meal influence the portion size effect? Serving larger portions leads to increased intake, but little is known about how the cost of a meal affects this response. Therefore, we tested whether the amount of money paid for a meal influenced the portion size effect at a lunch served in a controlled restaurant-style setting. In a crossover design, 79 adults (55 women; 24 men) came to the lab once a week for 4 weeks to eat a main dish of pasta with side dishes. Across weeks, the meal was varied in two factors: portion size of the main dish (400 g or 600 g) and cost of the meal (US$8 or $16). At discharge subjects completed questionnaires that assessed behaviors thought to influence the response to portion size and cost. Results showed that the portion size of the main dish had a significant effect on meal intake (P < 0.0001). The weight of food consumed at the meal increased by 18 ± 2% (mean ± SEM 83 ± 11 g) and energy intake increased by 20 ± 2% (133 ± 16 kcal) when the larger portion was served. These effects of portion size did not differ across the two levels of cost (both interactions P > 0.37) nor did meal cost have significant effects on meal intake (both P > 0.24). Subject scores for satiety responsiveness did, however, influence the effect of portion size on food intake (P = 0.0007). Serving larger portions led to increased intake in subjects with lower satiety responsiveness scores (P < 0.0001), but did not affect intake in those with higher scores. In summary, the effect of portion size on intake in a restaurant-style setting was not influenced by meal cost but was attenuated in individuals higher in satiety responsiveness. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Appetite Elsevier

Does the cost of a meal influence the portion size effect?

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0195-6663
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.appet.2018.05.020
Publisher site
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Abstract

Serving larger portions leads to increased intake, but little is known about how the cost of a meal affects this response. Therefore, we tested whether the amount of money paid for a meal influenced the portion size effect at a lunch served in a controlled restaurant-style setting. In a crossover design, 79 adults (55 women; 24 men) came to the lab once a week for 4 weeks to eat a main dish of pasta with side dishes. Across weeks, the meal was varied in two factors: portion size of the main dish (400 g or 600 g) and cost of the meal (US$8 or $16). At discharge subjects completed questionnaires that assessed behaviors thought to influence the response to portion size and cost. Results showed that the portion size of the main dish had a significant effect on meal intake (P < 0.0001). The weight of food consumed at the meal increased by 18 ± 2% (mean ± SEM 83 ± 11 g) and energy intake increased by 20 ± 2% (133 ± 16 kcal) when the larger portion was served. These effects of portion size did not differ across the two levels of cost (both interactions P > 0.37) nor did meal cost have significant effects on meal intake (both P > 0.24). Subject scores for satiety responsiveness did, however, influence the effect of portion size on food intake (P = 0.0007). Serving larger portions led to increased intake in subjects with lower satiety responsiveness scores (P < 0.0001), but did not affect intake in those with higher scores. In summary, the effect of portion size on intake in a restaurant-style setting was not influenced by meal cost but was attenuated in individuals higher in satiety responsiveness.

Journal

AppetiteElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2018

References

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