DNA metabarcoding to assess indoor fungal communities: Electrostatic dust collectors and Illumina sequencing

DNA metabarcoding to assess indoor fungal communities: Electrostatic dust collectors and Illumina... DNA metabarcoding is increasingly being used to characterize the microbiological composition of both the indoor and outdoor environments of dwellings. Our study aimed to evaluate metabarcoding and bioinformatic analysis resulting from calibrated samples and samples collected by an electrostatic dust collector (EDC) in dwellings with no moisture problems. Thus, the fungal communities of 14 dwellings (eastern France, Franche-Comté region) were analyzed by Illumina MiSeq technology after amplification of the ITS2 region.Using the standard samples of 11 species of yeasts and molds allowed us to validate the Operational taxonomic units (OTU) assignment. These calibrated samples also showed a low amplification bias, a low rate of sequencing errors and the semi-quantitative nature of the technique.Only one species from the calibrated samples (Lichtheimia corymbifera) was less amplified probably due to the presence of two mismatches in its3 primer.EDC analysis identified 3594OTU with 75% of reads corresponding to 30 genera. The main genera are those usually found by culture techniques (Penicillium, Aspergillus and Cladosporium), but findings also indicate others less commonly isolated in culture such as Epicoccum, the fourth detected genus in our study. The type of heating systems was correlated with fungal diversity. We found less diversity in the dwellings with wood heating and larger quantities of Epicoccum nigrum verified by qPCR.DNA metabarcoding analysis applied to EDC seems promising. However, we think that it must be used along with qPCR, to obtain a more global view of microbial ecology and relative quantification of species of interest within communities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal Of Microbiological Methods Elsevier

DNA metabarcoding to assess indoor fungal communities: Electrostatic dust collectors and Illumina sequencing

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0167-7012
eISSN
1872-8359
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.mimet.2017.05.014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DNA metabarcoding is increasingly being used to characterize the microbiological composition of both the indoor and outdoor environments of dwellings. Our study aimed to evaluate metabarcoding and bioinformatic analysis resulting from calibrated samples and samples collected by an electrostatic dust collector (EDC) in dwellings with no moisture problems. Thus, the fungal communities of 14 dwellings (eastern France, Franche-Comté region) were analyzed by Illumina MiSeq technology after amplification of the ITS2 region.Using the standard samples of 11 species of yeasts and molds allowed us to validate the Operational taxonomic units (OTU) assignment. These calibrated samples also showed a low amplification bias, a low rate of sequencing errors and the semi-quantitative nature of the technique.Only one species from the calibrated samples (Lichtheimia corymbifera) was less amplified probably due to the presence of two mismatches in its3 primer.EDC analysis identified 3594OTU with 75% of reads corresponding to 30 genera. The main genera are those usually found by culture techniques (Penicillium, Aspergillus and Cladosporium), but findings also indicate others less commonly isolated in culture such as Epicoccum, the fourth detected genus in our study. The type of heating systems was correlated with fungal diversity. We found less diversity in the dwellings with wood heating and larger quantities of Epicoccum nigrum verified by qPCR.DNA metabarcoding analysis applied to EDC seems promising. However, we think that it must be used along with qPCR, to obtain a more global view of microbial ecology and relative quantification of species of interest within communities.

Journal

Journal Of Microbiological MethodsElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2017

References

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