Distribution, accumulation, and fluxes of soil carbon in four monoculture lysimeters at San Dimas Experimental Forest, California

Distribution, accumulation, and fluxes of soil carbon in four monoculture lysimeters at San Dimas... This research examines how vegetation type controls soil processes involving soil carbon fluxes, accumulation, and transport in a chaparral ecosystem. Carbon concentrations and δ 13 C values were measured for soil samples collected in 1987 from 1-m depth profiles in four lysimeters in the San Dimas Experimental Forest, southern California, USA. Each lysimeter has sustained a single vegetation type since 1946, the species being Quercus dumosa , Ceanothus crassifolius , Adenostoma fasciculatum , and Pinus coulteri . Archived samples of soil originally used for filling the lysimeters and litter samples from the surface of each lysimeter were analyzed to determine initial and boundary conditions. Although detectable changes in carbon content were limited to the topmost 20 cm of the profiles, variations in δ 13 C were found to depths of 80 cm, indicating that processing of carbon occurs much deeper than indicated by carbon concentrations alone, underscoring the utility of carbon isotopes in the study of soil carbon dynamics. A one-dimensional model that considers surface carbon input, downward transport, and loss through decomposition is developed to describe the evolution of carbon concentration and stable carbon isotope ratios in the four soil profiles. Comparison of measured and calculated profiles yields estimates of carbon fluxes, turnover rates, and accumulation of soil carbon. A set of physical parameters, including the rate constant of decomposition, downward transport rate of organic carbon, and rate of carbon input from the surface are derived from the model and can be related to the species and environmental conditions. The calculations indicate the importance of species on soil formation and carbon cycles, which is important for understanding the effects of changes in land use on ecosystem processes. Our results also suggest that fire may increase the rate of soil carbon accumulation in a chaparral ecosystem. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta Elsevier

Distribution, accumulation, and fluxes of soil carbon in four monoculture lysimeters at San Dimas Experimental Forest, California

Loading next page...
1
 
/lp/elsevier/distribution-accumulation-and-fluxes-of-soil-carbon-in-four-NuODCBWAQy
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0016-7037
eISSN
1872-9533
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0016-7037(99)00048-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This research examines how vegetation type controls soil processes involving soil carbon fluxes, accumulation, and transport in a chaparral ecosystem. Carbon concentrations and δ 13 C values were measured for soil samples collected in 1987 from 1-m depth profiles in four lysimeters in the San Dimas Experimental Forest, southern California, USA. Each lysimeter has sustained a single vegetation type since 1946, the species being Quercus dumosa , Ceanothus crassifolius , Adenostoma fasciculatum , and Pinus coulteri . Archived samples of soil originally used for filling the lysimeters and litter samples from the surface of each lysimeter were analyzed to determine initial and boundary conditions. Although detectable changes in carbon content were limited to the topmost 20 cm of the profiles, variations in δ 13 C were found to depths of 80 cm, indicating that processing of carbon occurs much deeper than indicated by carbon concentrations alone, underscoring the utility of carbon isotopes in the study of soil carbon dynamics. A one-dimensional model that considers surface carbon input, downward transport, and loss through decomposition is developed to describe the evolution of carbon concentration and stable carbon isotope ratios in the four soil profiles. Comparison of measured and calculated profiles yields estimates of carbon fluxes, turnover rates, and accumulation of soil carbon. A set of physical parameters, including the rate constant of decomposition, downward transport rate of organic carbon, and rate of carbon input from the surface are derived from the model and can be related to the species and environmental conditions. The calculations indicate the importance of species on soil formation and carbon cycles, which is important for understanding the effects of changes in land use on ecosystem processes. Our results also suggest that fire may increase the rate of soil carbon accumulation in a chaparral ecosystem.

Journal

Geochimica et Cosmochimica ActaElsevier

Published: May 1, 1999

References

  • Soils and Geomorphology
    Birkeland, P.W.
  • Carbon isotopes reveal soil organic matter dynamics following arid land shrub expansion
    Connin, S.L.; Virginia, R.A.; Chamberlain, C.P.
  • Longevity of needle fascicles of Pinus longaeva (Bristlecone pine) and other North American pines
    Ewers, F.W.; Schmid, R.
  • Base cation biogeochemistry and weathering under oak and pine
    Quideau, S.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Graham, R.C.; Wood, H.B.
  • Organic carbon sequestration under chaparral and pine after four decades of soil development
    Quideau, S.A.; Graham, R.C.; Chadwick, O.A.; Wood, H.B.
  • Transformations of 2:1 phyllosilicates in 41-year-old soils under oak and pine
    Tice, K.R.; Graham, R.C.; Wood, H.B.
  • Decade-scale changes of soil carbon, nitrogen and exchangeable cations under chaparral and pine
    Ulery, A.L.; Graham, R.C.; Chadwick, O.A.; Wood, H.B.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off