Digital elevation model resolution: effects on terrain attribute calculation and quantitative soil-landscape modeling

Digital elevation model resolution: effects on terrain attribute calculation and quantitative... The accuracy of digital elevation models (DEM) and DEM-derived products depends on several factors, including the horizontal resolution and vertical precision at which the elevation data are represented, and the source of the elevation data. This accuracy becomes increasingly important as we extend the use of DEM data for spatial prediction of soil attributes. Our objective was to compare terrain attributes and quantitative soil-landscape models derived from grid-based DEM represented at different horizontal resolutions (10 and 30 m), represented at different vertical precisions (0.1 and 1 m), and acquired from different sources. Decreasing the horizontal resolution of the field survey DEM produced lower slope gradients on steeper slopes, steeper slope gradients on flatter slopes, narrower ranges in curvatures, larger specific catchment areas in upper landscape positions, and lower specific catchment areas values in lower landscape positions. Overall, certain landscape features were less discernible on the 30-m DEM than on the 10-m DEM. Decreased vertical precision produced a large proportion of points with zero slope gradient and zero slope curvature, and a large number of steeply sloping and more highly curved areas. Differences among DEM from different sources were more significant, with less accurate representation of depressions and drainage pathways with the USGS DEM as compared to the field survey DEM. Empirical models developed from different DEM included similar predictive terrain attributes, and were equally successful in predicting A-horizon depth (AHD) in the validation data set. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geoderma Elsevier

Digital elevation model resolution: effects on terrain attribute calculation and quantitative soil-landscape modeling

Geoderma, Volume 100 (1) – Mar 1, 2001

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0016-7061
eISSN
1872-6259
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0016-7061(00)00081-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The accuracy of digital elevation models (DEM) and DEM-derived products depends on several factors, including the horizontal resolution and vertical precision at which the elevation data are represented, and the source of the elevation data. This accuracy becomes increasingly important as we extend the use of DEM data for spatial prediction of soil attributes. Our objective was to compare terrain attributes and quantitative soil-landscape models derived from grid-based DEM represented at different horizontal resolutions (10 and 30 m), represented at different vertical precisions (0.1 and 1 m), and acquired from different sources. Decreasing the horizontal resolution of the field survey DEM produced lower slope gradients on steeper slopes, steeper slope gradients on flatter slopes, narrower ranges in curvatures, larger specific catchment areas in upper landscape positions, and lower specific catchment areas values in lower landscape positions. Overall, certain landscape features were less discernible on the 30-m DEM than on the 10-m DEM. Decreased vertical precision produced a large proportion of points with zero slope gradient and zero slope curvature, and a large number of steeply sloping and more highly curved areas. Differences among DEM from different sources were more significant, with less accurate representation of depressions and drainage pathways with the USGS DEM as compared to the field survey DEM. Empirical models developed from different DEM included similar predictive terrain attributes, and were equally successful in predicting A-horizon depth (AHD) in the validation data set.

Journal

GeodermaElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2001

References

  • Soil-landscape modelling using fuzzy c-means clustering attribute data derived from a digital elevation model (DEM)
    De Bruin, S.; Stein, A.
  • Soil-landform relationships at within-field scale: an investigation using continuous classification
    Lark, R.M.
  • A contour-based topographic model for hydrological and ecological applications
    Moore, I.D.; O'Loughlin, E.M.; Burch, G.J.
  • Scaling input data by GIS for hydrological modeling
    Thieken, A.H.; Lucke, A.; Diekkruger, B.; Richter, O.
  • A comparison of drainage networks derived from digital elevation models at two scales
    Wang, X.; Yin, Z.-Y.
  • Effects of digital elevation model map scale and data resolution on a topography based watershed model
    Wolock, D.M.; Price, C.V.
  • A cross-scale comparison of drainage basin characteristics derived from digital elevation models
    Yin, Z.-Y.; Wang, X.

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