Differential response to environmental and nutritional factors of high-quality tomato varieties

Differential response to environmental and nutritional factors of high-quality tomato varieties 1 Introduction</h5> The production of fruits and vegetables with improved traits has significant market advantages due to the increasing demand of consumers for food trade of highly-quality products. Quality of vegetable crops comprises several attributes in relation to appearance, texture, flavor and nutritional value but sensory issues have become a primary parameter for consumer’s acceptance of fruits and vegetables. Thus, in the case of tomato, one of the most widely consumed fresh vegetable, the lack of characteristic tomato flavor in modern cultivars is a common compliant among consumers ( Causse et al., 2010 ). Tomato flavor involves a large number of chemical constituents ( Malmendal et al., 2011; Petró-Turza, 1986–1987; Salles, Nicklaus, & Septier, 2003 ), some of which being antagonist, with different physicochemical properties and stabilities. Furthermore, several interrelated factors affect tomato composition: variety, environmental effects, cultivating conditions, ripening stage and post-harvest storage ( Anza, Riga, & Garbisu, 2006; Iglesias et al., 2014; Oms-Oliu et al., 2011; Sánchez-Pérez, Iglesias, López-Ortiz, Sánchez-Pérez, & Martínez-Galera, 2010; Sánchez-Pérez et al., 2011 ). Although traditional cultivars possess superior organoleptic attributes that modern hybrids ones, they have limited production and their commercialization is restricted to local markets due to the fast softening http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Chemistry Elsevier

Differential response to environmental and nutritional factors of high-quality tomato varieties

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0308-8146
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.12.043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The production of fruits and vegetables with improved traits has significant market advantages due to the increasing demand of consumers for food trade of highly-quality products. Quality of vegetable crops comprises several attributes in relation to appearance, texture, flavor and nutritional value but sensory issues have become a primary parameter for consumer’s acceptance of fruits and vegetables. Thus, in the case of tomato, one of the most widely consumed fresh vegetable, the lack of characteristic tomato flavor in modern cultivars is a common compliant among consumers ( Causse et al., 2010 ). Tomato flavor involves a large number of chemical constituents ( Malmendal et al., 2011; Petró-Turza, 1986–1987; Salles, Nicklaus, & Septier, 2003 ), some of which being antagonist, with different physicochemical properties and stabilities. Furthermore, several interrelated factors affect tomato composition: variety, environmental effects, cultivating conditions, ripening stage and post-harvest storage ( Anza, Riga, & Garbisu, 2006; Iglesias et al., 2014; Oms-Oliu et al., 2011; Sánchez-Pérez, Iglesias, López-Ortiz, Sánchez-Pérez, & Martínez-Galera, 2010; Sánchez-Pérez et al., 2011 ). Although traditional cultivars possess superior organoleptic attributes that modern hybrids ones, they have limited production and their commercialization is restricted to local markets due to the fast softening

Journal

Food ChemistryElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2015

References

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