Differences in behaviour of three biopolymer constituents in coagulation with polyaluminium chloride: Implications for the optimisation of a coagulation–membrane filtration process

Differences in behaviour of three biopolymer constituents in coagulation with polyaluminium... Coagulation is often applied as a pre-treatment for membrane processes to reduce dissolved organic matter and to prevent membrane fouling. Biopolymers (BPs) have repeatedly been reported as major organic foulants, and coagulation conditions such as pH or dose have been optimised to minimise the remaining BPs. Optimisation however remains problematic because of the complex and heterogenetic nature of BP. In this study, the behaviour of several BP fractions in a coagulation process was investigated by excitation–emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) following liquid chromatography (LC)-fractionation. Using a series of jar tests, we found that BP removal depends on the type of source water, reflecting differences in charge neutralisation conditions in three samples of natural water despite nearly identical processes for removing humic substances. This result demonstrates the complexity of optimisation for BP coagulation. Fractionation of EEM-PARAFAC to BP by LC showed that at least three organic component groups (C1, C2 and C3) constitute BP. C1 is tryptophan-like organic matter that is often found in wastewater effluent, C2 is tyrosine-like organic matter that has a phenolic chemical structure, and C3 is a humic-like substance. C1 was removed thoroughly at acidic pH but not at neutral pH, while the removal of C2 was inefficient even with a significant change in pH or dose, indicating similar difficulties in a coagulation process. The difference in components C1 and C2 may partly explain the difference in efficiencies of removal of BP in water from different sources. Our investigation suggests that the optimisation or selection of appropriate pre-treatment processes for membrane systems should be substantially based on the composition of BPs (e.g., C1 and C2 components). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Research Elsevier

Differences in behaviour of three biopolymer constituents in coagulation with polyaluminium chloride: Implications for the optimisation of a coagulation–membrane filtration process

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/differences-in-behaviour-of-three-biopolymer-constituents-in-suHl14AmGe
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0043-1354
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.watres.2018.01.034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Coagulation is often applied as a pre-treatment for membrane processes to reduce dissolved organic matter and to prevent membrane fouling. Biopolymers (BPs) have repeatedly been reported as major organic foulants, and coagulation conditions such as pH or dose have been optimised to minimise the remaining BPs. Optimisation however remains problematic because of the complex and heterogenetic nature of BP. In this study, the behaviour of several BP fractions in a coagulation process was investigated by excitation–emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) following liquid chromatography (LC)-fractionation. Using a series of jar tests, we found that BP removal depends on the type of source water, reflecting differences in charge neutralisation conditions in three samples of natural water despite nearly identical processes for removing humic substances. This result demonstrates the complexity of optimisation for BP coagulation. Fractionation of EEM-PARAFAC to BP by LC showed that at least three organic component groups (C1, C2 and C3) constitute BP. C1 is tryptophan-like organic matter that is often found in wastewater effluent, C2 is tyrosine-like organic matter that has a phenolic chemical structure, and C3 is a humic-like substance. C1 was removed thoroughly at acidic pH but not at neutral pH, while the removal of C2 was inefficient even with a significant change in pH or dose, indicating similar difficulties in a coagulation process. The difference in components C1 and C2 may partly explain the difference in efficiencies of removal of BP in water from different sources. Our investigation suggests that the optimisation or selection of appropriate pre-treatment processes for membrane systems should be substantially based on the composition of BPs (e.g., C1 and C2 components).

Journal

Water ResearchElsevier

Published: Apr 15, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off