Dietary fiber and control of body weight

Dietary fiber and control of body weight <h5>Introduction</h5> Overweight and obesity have dramatically increased in the last few decades, both in industrialized and in developing countries. While the protective effect of a fiber-rich diet against cardiovascular disease or Type II-diabetes have been widely recognized, however, the possible effects of dietary fiber on weight maintenance or loss are still debated.</P><h5>Dietary fiber</h5> This general term covers a large number of molecules (e.g. cellulose, hemi-celluloses, pectins, gums etc.) present in plant foods that have the specific property not to be digested in the upper part of the gut but to be fermented in the colon to a variable extent. Although not considered to be nutrients per se, their influence on metabolism and benefits for health have been known for decades.</P><h5>A cross-cultural study</h5> Between 1958 and 1964, 12,763 men from 16 cohorts were investigated in the well-known Seven Countries Study. A specific assessment has recently been performed [1] . Mean dietary fiber intake ranged from 21.0 to 57.2 gram per day (g/d) in the 16 cohorts, with subjects mean body mass index (BMI) ranging from 21.8 to 26.6. Population-average total dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with population-average subscapular skinfold thickness, a surrogate marker of truncal fat, in both http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases Elsevier

Dietary fiber and control of body weight

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0939-4753
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.numecd.2006.07.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<h5>Introduction</h5> Overweight and obesity have dramatically increased in the last few decades, both in industrialized and in developing countries. While the protective effect of a fiber-rich diet against cardiovascular disease or Type II-diabetes have been widely recognized, however, the possible effects of dietary fiber on weight maintenance or loss are still debated.</P><h5>Dietary fiber</h5> This general term covers a large number of molecules (e.g. cellulose, hemi-celluloses, pectins, gums etc.) present in plant foods that have the specific property not to be digested in the upper part of the gut but to be fermented in the colon to a variable extent. Although not considered to be nutrients per se, their influence on metabolism and benefits for health have been known for decades.</P><h5>A cross-cultural study</h5> Between 1958 and 1964, 12,763 men from 16 cohorts were investigated in the well-known Seven Countries Study. A specific assessment has recently been performed [1] . Mean dietary fiber intake ranged from 21.0 to 57.2 gram per day (g/d) in the 16 cohorts, with subjects mean body mass index (BMI) ranging from 21.8 to 26.6. Population-average total dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with population-average subscapular skinfold thickness, a surrogate marker of truncal fat, in both

Journal

Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2007

References

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