Diet reconstruction for an extinct deer (Cervidae: Cetartiodactyla) from the Quaternary of South America

Diet reconstruction for an extinct deer (Cervidae: Cetartiodactyla) from the Quaternary of South... Among the extinct cervids of the Pleistocene in South America, Morenelaphus has the most abundant fossil record and the broadest geographic distribution. However, the paleoecology of Morenelaphus is poorly known, especially its dietary patterns; thus, this study aims to recognize the feeding habits of this extinct cervid through analysis of microwear. The microwear analysis indicated a mixed-feeder diet for Morenelaphus; both high pit values and frequency of individuals with low number of fine scratches indicated the consumption of grasses, possibly including grit (siliciclastic sediment), ingested during feeding. Also, our results suggest that Morenelaphus possibly went extinct at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition as a result of climate/environmental changes and/or a physiological/nutritional crisis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology" Elsevier

Diet reconstruction for an extinct deer (Cervidae: Cetartiodactyla) from the Quaternary of South America

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0031-0182
eISSN
1872-616X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.palaeo.2018.02.026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Among the extinct cervids of the Pleistocene in South America, Morenelaphus has the most abundant fossil record and the broadest geographic distribution. However, the paleoecology of Morenelaphus is poorly known, especially its dietary patterns; thus, this study aims to recognize the feeding habits of this extinct cervid through analysis of microwear. The microwear analysis indicated a mixed-feeder diet for Morenelaphus; both high pit values and frequency of individuals with low number of fine scratches indicated the consumption of grasses, possibly including grit (siliciclastic sediment), ingested during feeding. Also, our results suggest that Morenelaphus possibly went extinct at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition as a result of climate/environmental changes and/or a physiological/nutritional crisis.

Journal

"Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology"Elsevier

Published: May 15, 2018

References

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