Diet and gut microbiota of two supralittoral amphipods Orchestia montagui and Talitrus saltator living in different microhabitats

Diet and gut microbiota of two supralittoral amphipods Orchestia montagui and Talitrus saltator... Talitrus saltator (Montagu) and Orchestia montagui Audouin live in different microhabitats of the same supralittoral belt. T. saltator can be found in the damp sand of beaches with scarce or absent wracked material near the water line. O. montagui is frequently found in the Posidonia banquettes or under wracked material, often in contact with the substrate. This study investigates the effect of diet on species-specific gut microbiota patterns in these talitrid species. Adults were collected and fed with artificial food (commercial fish food and pieces of blotting paper) for 51 days. Gut microbiota were analyzed at five time intervals (0 h, 24 h, 7, 23 and 51 days) by 16S rRNA gene metagenomic analysis and by estimating the relative abundance of cellulases (glycosyl hydrolase gene family 48, GHF48) gene copies. The gut microbiota of O. montagui was more affected than that of T. saltator by diet shift. Although the taxonomic profile of the gut microbiota varied with time in both species, with an increase of Protobacteria in O. montagui and of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes in T. saltator, genes involved in cellulose degradation (GHF48 family) showed a large-scale increase in O. montagui but not in T. saltator. We conclude that the diet variation has different influence on the composition of gut microbiota in the two talitrid species in accordance with their different alimentary habits: the more generalist T. saltator (detritivore, grazer, and scavenger) showed less changes in its gut microbiota composition than the more specialist O. montagui (detritivore and grazer), which strongly modified its gut microbiota composition by the captivity diet. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science Elsevier

Diet and gut microbiota of two supralittoral amphipods Orchestia montagui and Talitrus saltator living in different microhabitats

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0272-7714
eISSN
1096-0015
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecss.2017.08.016
Publisher site
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Abstract

Talitrus saltator (Montagu) and Orchestia montagui Audouin live in different microhabitats of the same supralittoral belt. T. saltator can be found in the damp sand of beaches with scarce or absent wracked material near the water line. O. montagui is frequently found in the Posidonia banquettes or under wracked material, often in contact with the substrate. This study investigates the effect of diet on species-specific gut microbiota patterns in these talitrid species. Adults were collected and fed with artificial food (commercial fish food and pieces of blotting paper) for 51 days. Gut microbiota were analyzed at five time intervals (0 h, 24 h, 7, 23 and 51 days) by 16S rRNA gene metagenomic analysis and by estimating the relative abundance of cellulases (glycosyl hydrolase gene family 48, GHF48) gene copies. The gut microbiota of O. montagui was more affected than that of T. saltator by diet shift. Although the taxonomic profile of the gut microbiota varied with time in both species, with an increase of Protobacteria in O. montagui and of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes in T. saltator, genes involved in cellulose degradation (GHF48 family) showed a large-scale increase in O. montagui but not in T. saltator. We conclude that the diet variation has different influence on the composition of gut microbiota in the two talitrid species in accordance with their different alimentary habits: the more generalist T. saltator (detritivore, grazer, and scavenger) showed less changes in its gut microbiota composition than the more specialist O. montagui (detritivore and grazer), which strongly modified its gut microbiota composition by the captivity diet.

Journal

Estuarine Coastal and Shelf ScienceElsevier

Published: Oct 15, 2017

References

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