Did plate tectonics shutdown in the Palaeoproterozoic? A view from the Siderian geologic record

Did plate tectonics shutdown in the Palaeoproterozoic? A view from the Siderian geologic record 1 Introduction</h5> The early Palaeoproterozoic Siderian Period (2.5–2.3 Ga; Plumb, 1991 ) has long been an intriguing part of the Precambrian due to the large number of fundamental changes in geologic signatures of Earth's evolution ( Reddy and Evans, 2009 ). For over a decade it has been recognized that there was an apparent minima in the juvenile magmatic record during this time, specifically between 2.45 and 2.2 Ga ( Condie, 1998; Condie et al., 2005 ). The origin of this minima, and others like it at various times in Earth history, has been the subject of vigorous debate centering around end-member models of crustal growth and the extent to which episodic peaks in juvenile magmatism represent recycling ( Armstrong, 1981 ), peaks in juvenile crustal addition ( Condie et al., 2005 ) or peaks in preservation ( Hawkesworth et al., 2009; Cawood et al., 2013 ). Juvenile continental or oceanic crust formation is most commonly considered to link to periods of orogenesis and supercontinent assembly ( Barley et al., 2005; Condie et al., 2005, 2009; Bradley, 2011; Nance et al., 2014; Furnes et al., 2014 ), wherein subduction and spreading add juvenile crust and orogenesis or accretion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gondwana Research Elsevier

Did plate tectonics shutdown in the Palaeoproterozoic? A view from the Siderian geologic record

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1342-937X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.gr.2014.06.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The early Palaeoproterozoic Siderian Period (2.5–2.3 Ga; Plumb, 1991 ) has long been an intriguing part of the Precambrian due to the large number of fundamental changes in geologic signatures of Earth's evolution ( Reddy and Evans, 2009 ). For over a decade it has been recognized that there was an apparent minima in the juvenile magmatic record during this time, specifically between 2.45 and 2.2 Ga ( Condie, 1998; Condie et al., 2005 ). The origin of this minima, and others like it at various times in Earth history, has been the subject of vigorous debate centering around end-member models of crustal growth and the extent to which episodic peaks in juvenile magmatism represent recycling ( Armstrong, 1981 ), peaks in juvenile crustal addition ( Condie et al., 2005 ) or peaks in preservation ( Hawkesworth et al., 2009; Cawood et al., 2013 ). Juvenile continental or oceanic crust formation is most commonly considered to link to periods of orogenesis and supercontinent assembly ( Barley et al., 2005; Condie et al., 2005, 2009; Bradley, 2011; Nance et al., 2014; Furnes et al., 2014 ), wherein subduction and spreading add juvenile crust and orogenesis or accretion

Journal

Gondwana ResearchElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2014

References

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