Development of carbon-capture binder using stainless steel argon oxygen decarburization slag activated by carbonation

Development of carbon-capture binder using stainless steel argon oxygen decarburization slag... The study aims at evaluating the possibility of using stainless-steel argon oxygen decarburization (AOD) slag containing γ-C2S as a carbon-capture construction material. For this purpose, the physicochemical changes of paste specimens with different levels of AOD slag replacement up to 70% were investigated by means of carbonation curing. γ-C2S is non-hydraulic, and hence, does not react with water at room temperature. After carbonation, however, γ-C2S yields reaction products such as calcite and silica gel that fill up the pores within the cement paste creating a high-density microstructure. As a result, the carbonated specimens demonstrate increased compressive strength. Due to its relatively insoluble property under typical carbonation curing conditions, silica gel is formed on the surfaces of reacting γ-C2S particles. Therefore, crystalline calcite and highly polymerized silica, formed as a result of CO2 curing, play an important role in achieving the desired strength. Their role could be considered similar to that of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), which are formed when concrete produced from Portland cement is hardened. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cleaner Production Elsevier

Development of carbon-capture binder using stainless steel argon oxygen decarburization slag activated by carbonation

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-6526
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.01.189
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The study aims at evaluating the possibility of using stainless-steel argon oxygen decarburization (AOD) slag containing γ-C2S as a carbon-capture construction material. For this purpose, the physicochemical changes of paste specimens with different levels of AOD slag replacement up to 70% were investigated by means of carbonation curing. γ-C2S is non-hydraulic, and hence, does not react with water at room temperature. After carbonation, however, γ-C2S yields reaction products such as calcite and silica gel that fill up the pores within the cement paste creating a high-density microstructure. As a result, the carbonated specimens demonstrate increased compressive strength. Due to its relatively insoluble property under typical carbonation curing conditions, silica gel is formed on the surfaces of reacting γ-C2S particles. Therefore, crystalline calcite and highly polymerized silica, formed as a result of CO2 curing, play an important role in achieving the desired strength. Their role could be considered similar to that of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), which are formed when concrete produced from Portland cement is hardened.

Journal

Journal of Cleaner ProductionElsevier

Published: Apr 10, 2018

References

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