Development and preliminary validation of the mindfulness inventory for sport

Development and preliminary validation of the mindfulness inventory for sport Mindfulness involves non-judgmental and moment-to-moment awareness of the present experience ( Kabat-Zinn, 2003 ) and was originally developed as a clinical technique for the treatment of disorders such as depression or anxiety. Bishop et al. (2004) proposed a two-component model of mindfulness within these clinical contexts. The first component refers to self-regulation of attention, which encompasses the ability to monitor current thoughts, emotions and sensations, switch from one focus of attention to another and inhibit elaborative processes such as worry and rumination. The second component involves the adoption of an acceptance stance towards each moment of one's experience, characterised by a non-judgmental attitude of openness and curiosity, allowing any thoughts, emotions and sensations to occur with no further elaboration.</P>As a specific attentional strategy, mindfulness has become a subject of interest in sport. The performance-oriented nature of sport necessitates a sustained focus of attention on goal-related cues, while disengaging from disruptive stimuli ( Gardner & Moore, 2007; Moran, 2009 ). Gardner and Moore (2004, 2007) hypothesised that greater awareness, allied with a non-judgmental attitude, allows for optimal self-regulation in terms of attention and behaviour. When displaying a high level of mindfulness, athletes are theorised to be able to acknowledge http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology of Sport and Exercise Elsevier

Development and preliminary validation of the mindfulness inventory for sport

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1469-0292
DOI
10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.10.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mindfulness involves non-judgmental and moment-to-moment awareness of the present experience ( Kabat-Zinn, 2003 ) and was originally developed as a clinical technique for the treatment of disorders such as depression or anxiety. Bishop et al. (2004) proposed a two-component model of mindfulness within these clinical contexts. The first component refers to self-regulation of attention, which encompasses the ability to monitor current thoughts, emotions and sensations, switch from one focus of attention to another and inhibit elaborative processes such as worry and rumination. The second component involves the adoption of an acceptance stance towards each moment of one's experience, characterised by a non-judgmental attitude of openness and curiosity, allowing any thoughts, emotions and sensations to occur with no further elaboration.</P>As a specific attentional strategy, mindfulness has become a subject of interest in sport. The performance-oriented nature of sport necessitates a sustained focus of attention on goal-related cues, while disengaging from disruptive stimuli ( Gardner & Moore, 2007; Moran, 2009 ). Gardner and Moore (2004, 2007) hypothesised that greater awareness, allied with a non-judgmental attitude, allows for optimal self-regulation in terms of attention and behaviour. When displaying a high level of mindfulness, athletes are theorised to be able to acknowledge

Journal

Psychology of Sport and ExerciseElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2014

References

  • The dimensions of perfectionism
    Frost, R.O.; Marten, P.; Lahart, C.; Rosenblate, R.
  • The mediating influence of unconditional self-acceptance and labile self-esteem on the relationship between multidimensional perfectionism and exercise dependence
    Hall, H.K.; Hill, A.P.; Appleton, P.R.; Kozub, S.A.
  • Relationships between mindfulness, flow dispositions, and mental skills adoption: a cluster analytic approach
    Kee, Y.H.; Wang, C.K.J.
  • Cognitive psychology in sport: progress and prospects
    Moran, A.P.
  • Detached mindfulness in cognitive therapy: a metacognitive analysis and ten techniques
    Wells, A.

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