Detection of BT transgenic maize in foodstuffs

Detection of BT transgenic maize in foodstuffs Different foodstuffs for humans and monogastric animals were analysed to detect CryIA(b) gene and quantify the CryIA(b) protein present in the transgenic maize used as an ingredient. Eight out of 32 foods obtained from the market showed to have been elaborated with transgenic Bt maize. Specific primers used to identify the transgenic event revealed that Mon810 was predominantly present in the foodstuffs. A commercial ELISA test allowed the quantification of the CryIA(b) protein in low processed foods, and found that 0.1 ppm was the highest value per gram of food. A Western blot carried out with immuno-purified polyclonal antibodies was capable of detecting both the intact or degraded CryIA(b) protein depending on the food assayed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Research International Elsevier

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0963-9969
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.foodres.2005.07.013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Different foodstuffs for humans and monogastric animals were analysed to detect CryIA(b) gene and quantify the CryIA(b) protein present in the transgenic maize used as an ingredient. Eight out of 32 foods obtained from the market showed to have been elaborated with transgenic Bt maize. Specific primers used to identify the transgenic event revealed that Mon810 was predominantly present in the foodstuffs. A commercial ELISA test allowed the quantification of the CryIA(b) protein in low processed foods, and found that 0.1 ppm was the highest value per gram of food. A Western blot carried out with immuno-purified polyclonal antibodies was capable of detecting both the intact or degraded CryIA(b) protein depending on the food assayed.

Journal

Food Research InternationalElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2006

References

  • Detection of genetically modified organisms in foods
    Ahmed, F.E.
  • Detection of the genetic modification in heat-treated products of Bt-maize by polymerase chain reaction
    Hupfer, C.; Hotzel, H.; Sachse, K.; Engel, K.H.
  • Validation of a method based on polymerase chain reaction for the detection of genetically modified organisms in various processed foodstuffs
    Lipp, M.; Bluth, A.; Eyquem, F.; Kruse, L.; Schimmel, H.; Van den Eede, G.

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