Depressive symptoms increase fall risk in older people, independent of antidepressant use, and reduced executive and physical functioning

Depressive symptoms increase fall risk in older people, independent of antidepressant use, and... 1 Introduction</h5> Falls are common in older people with studies reporting prevalence rates of approximately 30–40% per annum ( Tinetti, Speechley, & Ginter, 1988; Watson, Clapperton, & Mitchell, 2010 ). The consequences of falls are serious and include injury, reduced functional ability, hospitalization, premature nursing home admission and death ( Potter-Forbes & Aisbett, 2003; Tinetti & Williams, 1997 ). While prevalence estimates of major depressive disorder for older people are generally low and comparable to younger adults at around 1–4%, clinically relevant symptoms of depression are more common with rates consistently reported at about 15–32% in older people ( Anstey, von Sanden, & Sargent-Cox, 2007; Beekman, Deeg, & van Tilburg, 1995 ).</P>Depressive symptomatology has been identified as a risk factor for falls in a number of prospective studies ( Biderman, Cwikel, & Fried, 2002; Gassmann, Rupprecht, & Freiberger, 2009 ). This causal association can be explained through various mechanisms including physical, cognitive and biochemical pathways. Several physical factors including impaired balance, reduced muscle strength and slowed gait speed have been linked to both an increased risk of falling ( Lord, Clark, & Webster, 1991; Tinetti & Kumar, 2010 ) and depressive symptoms ( Hausdorff, Nelson, & Kaliton, 2001 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics Elsevier

Depressive symptoms increase fall risk in older people, independent of antidepressant use, and reduced executive and physical functioning

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd
ISSN
0167-4943
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.archger.2014.09.003
Publisher site
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Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Falls are common in older people with studies reporting prevalence rates of approximately 30–40% per annum ( Tinetti, Speechley, & Ginter, 1988; Watson, Clapperton, & Mitchell, 2010 ). The consequences of falls are serious and include injury, reduced functional ability, hospitalization, premature nursing home admission and death ( Potter-Forbes & Aisbett, 2003; Tinetti & Williams, 1997 ). While prevalence estimates of major depressive disorder for older people are generally low and comparable to younger adults at around 1–4%, clinically relevant symptoms of depression are more common with rates consistently reported at about 15–32% in older people ( Anstey, von Sanden, & Sargent-Cox, 2007; Beekman, Deeg, & van Tilburg, 1995 ).</P>Depressive symptomatology has been identified as a risk factor for falls in a number of prospective studies ( Biderman, Cwikel, & Fried, 2002; Gassmann, Rupprecht, & Freiberger, 2009 ). This causal association can be explained through various mechanisms including physical, cognitive and biochemical pathways. Several physical factors including impaired balance, reduced muscle strength and slowed gait speed have been linked to both an increased risk of falling ( Lord, Clark, & Webster, 1991; Tinetti & Kumar, 2010 ) and depressive symptoms ( Hausdorff, Nelson, & Kaliton, 2001

Journal

Archives of Gerontology and GeriatricsElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 2015

References

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