Demonstration of aluminum in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease

Demonstration of aluminum in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques in the brains of... Aluminum (Al) exposure has been reported to be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer type), although the role of Al in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease remains controversial. We examined the presence of Al in the Alzheimer’s brain using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM-EDX). TEM-EDX analysis allows simultaneous imaging of subcellular structures with high spatial resolution and analysis of small quantities of elements contained in the same subcellular structures. We identified senile plaques by observation using TEM and detected Al in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques located in the hippocampus and the temporal lobe by EDX. Phosphorus and calcium were also present in the amyloid fibers. No Al could be detected in the extracellular space in senile plaques or in the cytoplasm of nerve cells. In this study, we demonstrated colocalization of Al and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques. The results support the following possibilities in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease: Al could be involved in the aggregation of Abeta peptides to form toxic fibrils; Al might induce Abeta peptides into the beta-sheet structure; and Al might facilitate iron-mediated oxidative reactions, which cause severe damage to brain tissues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry Elsevier

Demonstration of aluminum in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0162-0134
eISSN
1873-3344
DOI
10.1016/j.jinorgbio.2009.07.023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aluminum (Al) exposure has been reported to be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer type), although the role of Al in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease remains controversial. We examined the presence of Al in the Alzheimer’s brain using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM-EDX). TEM-EDX analysis allows simultaneous imaging of subcellular structures with high spatial resolution and analysis of small quantities of elements contained in the same subcellular structures. We identified senile plaques by observation using TEM and detected Al in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques located in the hippocampus and the temporal lobe by EDX. Phosphorus and calcium were also present in the amyloid fibers. No Al could be detected in the extracellular space in senile plaques or in the cytoplasm of nerve cells. In this study, we demonstrated colocalization of Al and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques. The results support the following possibilities in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease: Al could be involved in the aggregation of Abeta peptides to form toxic fibrils; Al might induce Abeta peptides into the beta-sheet structure; and Al might facilitate iron-mediated oxidative reactions, which cause severe damage to brain tissues.

Journal

Journal of Inorganic BiochemistryElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2009

References

  • Exp. Neurol.
    DeWitt, D.A.; Perry, G.; Cohen, M.; Doller, C.; Silver, J.
  • Biochim. Biophys. Acta
    Smith, D.G.; Cappai, R.; Barnham, K.J.
  • Brain Res.
    Xie, C.X.; Mattson, M.P.; Lovell, M.A.; Yokel, R.A.

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