Deformation and failure mechanisms in graphene oxide paper using in situ nanomechanical tensile testing

Deformation and failure mechanisms in graphene oxide paper using in situ nanomechanical tensile... 1 Introduction</h5> Graphene is one of the strongest materials known and shows outstanding mechanical performance for a range of applications [1–5] . Difficulties in processing have driven strategies to modify graphene towards scalable manufacturing. In particular, the decoration of the graphene basal plane and edges with functional groups, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl, to produce graphene oxide (GO) remains a promising manufacturing route. Subsequent processing of GO from solution has provided a popular methodology and allows fabrication of paper-like assemblies consisting of layers of GO sheets [4–9] . A number of techniques have been employed to understand the mechanical behavior of graphene and GO but are commonly based on macroscopic tensile testing for bulk measurements or AFM nanoindentation for inherent single-layer measurements. Specifically, AFM nanoindentation has revealed an individual graphene sheet breaking strength of 130 GPa, which approaches theoretical limits defined by the sp 2 bonding of a perfect defect free basal plane structure [1] , but chemical modification of graphene to GO typically results in a reduction in mechanical performance [10,11] . However, the indenting AFM tips in these experiments cause potential stress localization and result in local determination of the failure properties of an individual http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Carbon Elsevier

Deformation and failure mechanisms in graphene oxide paper using in situ nanomechanical tensile testing

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0008-6223
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.carbon.2013.07.019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Graphene is one of the strongest materials known and shows outstanding mechanical performance for a range of applications [1–5] . Difficulties in processing have driven strategies to modify graphene towards scalable manufacturing. In particular, the decoration of the graphene basal plane and edges with functional groups, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl, to produce graphene oxide (GO) remains a promising manufacturing route. Subsequent processing of GO from solution has provided a popular methodology and allows fabrication of paper-like assemblies consisting of layers of GO sheets [4–9] . A number of techniques have been employed to understand the mechanical behavior of graphene and GO but are commonly based on macroscopic tensile testing for bulk measurements or AFM nanoindentation for inherent single-layer measurements. Specifically, AFM nanoindentation has revealed an individual graphene sheet breaking strength of 130 GPa, which approaches theoretical limits defined by the sp 2 bonding of a perfect defect free basal plane structure [1] , but chemical modification of graphene to GO typically results in a reduction in mechanical performance [10,11] . However, the indenting AFM tips in these experiments cause potential stress localization and result in local determination of the failure properties of an individual

Journal

CarbonElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2013

References

  • Graphene as transparent electrode material for organic electronics
    Pang, S.P.; Hernandez, Y.; Feng, X.L.; Mullen, K.
  • On the tensile strength distribution of multiwalled carbon nanotubes
    Barber, A.H.; Andrews, R.; Schadler, L.S.; Wagner, H.D.
  • Quantized fracture mechanics
    Pugno, N.M.; Ruoff, R.S.
  • Influence of SEM vacuum on bone micromechanics using in situ AFM
    Jimenez-Palomar, I.; Shipov, A.; Shahar, R.; Barber, A.H.
  • Frictional characteristics of exfoliated and epitaxial graphene
    Shin, Y.J.; Stromberg, R.; Nay, R.; Huang, H.; Wee, A.T.; Yang, H.
  • Stochastic strength of nanotubes: an appraisal of available data
    Barber, A.H.; Kaplan-Ashiri, I.; Cohen, S.R.; Tenne, R.; Wagner, H.D.

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